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Monthly Archives: March 2008

High oil costs help alternative energy compete, but high commodity prices hurt

High oil prices can make alternative fuels more competitive in the marketplace. The problem is that prices for commodities like soybeans and corn used to make alternative fuels are also high at present. “We’re doing fine,” says Clint Vegas, president of Delta BioFuels (http://www.deltabiofuels.com/), Natchez, a new biodiesel refinery that primarily uses soybean oil to make biodiesel. “Energy prices actually ...

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Mississippi State researchers harnessing power of sludge

In the not too distant future, our vehicles may be running on biodiesel fuel produced from fatty microorganisms grown in sludge from wastewater treatment plants. That’s a project underway by a research team at Mississippi State University (MSU) that will be part of solving the country’s energy dilemma. It will also figure into the state’s role as a leader in ...

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You can bank on green ag for protecting environment, pocketbook

The greening of agriculture isn’t just about becoming more sustainable and protecting the environment. It also saves “green.” Agricultural practices that reduce erosion, water use and input of fertilizer and other farm chemicals can save a significant amount of money. One of the biggest trends in the state is precision agriculture, which is being used on approximately 25,000 acres of ...

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Mississippi home to innovative alternative energy progress

Abundant, affordable energy is the lifeblood of the state and national economy, says Motice Bruce, director of the Energy Division of the Mississippi Development Authority (MDA). “A finite supply of fossil fuel, instability of the Middle East and current discussions on global warming/climate change all contribute to the need for energy production in Mississippi,” Bruce says. “Alternative energy production will ...

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Green revolution in wastewater nature’s answer to pollution

Mississippi was the leader of a “green revolution” in wastewater treatment that started approximately 20 years ago growing out of research done at the Stennis Space Center by Dr. Bill Wolverton designed to treat polluted air and wastewater in future moon colonies or space stations. What Wolverton found was that wastewater could be treated with natural plant systems that cost ...

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Law firm embraces green in move to Highland Colony Parkway

The law firm of Butler, Snow, O’Mara, Stevens & Cannada, PLLC, is headed for Highland Colony Parkway, and will occupy a facility that is incorporating a number of “green” components. Butler Snow is moving from Jackson to a new office on the Ridgeland thoroughfare, part of the lifestyle development Renaissance at Colony Park, that, when completed, will be Leadership in ...

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Mississippi Green Built taking ICF products around the world

Though it has been in operation for less than a year, Mississippi Green Built (MGB), manufacturer of polystyrene insulated concrete form (ICF) products, has already become an international player. A plant fashioned after the company’s Lumberton facility is being built in Sao Tome, an island off the coast of Africa with the assistance of MGB staff, and the company has ...

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Environmentally-friendly standard touted as future of design

As the building of more structures goes green, LEED is a buzzword gaining momentum. It stands for Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design and is an accreditation process through the U.S. Green Building Council by which the green quotient of a building is measured. Architects and engineers can become LEED accredited and buildings can be LEED certified if a checklist ...

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High-end homebuyers want the hottest when it comes to kitchens

Amenities in high-end homes have evolved over the years. Builders say kitchens — indoor and outdoor — are now often the star of the home. Other popular features include non-carpeted flooring, high ceilings, built-in high definition entertainment components and large moldings. Gulfport designer and builder Dalton McGuire Jr. says it’s nothing for a kitchen in an upper end home to ...

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Busy executives taking time to connect with communities

Although they’re among the state’s busiest people, many of Mississippi’s executives take time to give back to their communities. The Mississippi Business Journal spoke to five leaders whose involvement runs the gamut of charitable, community and civic causes. Jerry Host, president and CEO of Trustmark Bank, is a long time participant with Habitat for Humanity. He and his wife, Olivia ...

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