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Daily Archives: September 4, 2011

Start of Toyota production in Mississippi draws near

By DENNIS SEID of the Northeast Mississippi Daily Journal, Tupelo BLUE SPRINGS — At the 2 million-square-foot Toyota Motor Manufacturing Mississippi plant, the first Corollas have already been made. But they’re not for sale just yet. The test cars are works in progress, allowing team members — Toyota’s term for its employees — to put their knowledge and training to ...

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Rogers resigns as CEO at Parkway Properties

JACKSON —  Parkway Properties, Inc. (NYSE: PKY) announced Friday that Steven G. Rogers has resigned as President, Chief Executive Officer and director effective December 31, 2011. Mr. Rogers will continue in his current roles until year end, and during this period will transition his leadership responsibilities to James R. Heistand, current Executive Chairman. Heistand will become acting CEO effective January ...

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Former MBJ editor, co-owner Buddy Bynum dead at 59

RIDGELAND — James L. “Buddy” Bynum, former editor and co-owner of the Mississippi Business Journal and a former aide to Gov. Haley Barbour and former Sen. Trent Lott, has died at his home in Ridgeland. He was 59. Family members said Bynum died Saturday of complications of pancreatic cancer. A funeral service will be held 11 a.m. Thursday at the Chapel of ...

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How much good will sex ed do? Experts say emotional health, molestation must be addressed

Experts: Emotional health, molestation must be addressed The causes and solutions for Mississippi’s teen pregnancy epidemic differ based on who is asked. Popular complaints are the lack of general sex education, limited access to and knowledge of contraceptives and programs that teach abstinence only. Other experienced voices less frequently heard emphasize the negative emotional and psychological effects early sex has ...

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Contractors face growing cash-flow challenges

A decade ago, Mississippi’s construction industry was enjoying arguably its most profitable period in history — a golden age. Building was booming, and most firms had as much as they could handle. However, the last 10 years have been perhaps the worst of times for the state’s contractors. They are now scrambling — and paying much closer attention to their ...

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How much good will sex education do?

The causes and solutions for Mississippi’s teen pregnancy epidemic differ based on who is asked. Popular complaints are the lack of general sex education, limited access to and knowledge of contraceptives and programs that teach abstinence only. Other experienced voices less frequently heard emphasize the negative emotional and psychological effects early sex has for teens and the failure to address ...

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Regions sets debit card fees

In a soon-to-arrive consequence of the Dodd Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act, Regions Bank in mid-October will begin charging customers in Mississippi and elsewhere a $4 monthly fee for debit card use. The financial services sector has been predicting for the past year that Dodd Frank’s mandated cut in swipe card fees paid to a debit card’s ...

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Southern Writers gives glimpse of where and how writers create

We bibliophiles often are not only fascinated by what writers write but also by how, when and where they write. “Southern Writers” answers some of those questions in a revealing pictorial of seventy-two critically and popularly acclaimed writers of the contemporary American South. I recently received a copy of this book as a birthday gift, and I’m enjoying getting to ...

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The Fed doing its job way it was meant to be

Hgh treason? Them’s fighting words! I must come to the defense of the Fed. The Federal Reserve was created in 1913 in response to the booms and busts in our economy. Booms were great, but the busts were causing too much pain. We were looking for a way to smooth out our business cycle, and this was the mechanism employed. ...

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Friedman leads from front

In 1755, during the French and Indian War, 23-year-old George Washington was a young officer in the British military. In a famous battle, Indian soldiers ambushed his militia and they came under heavy fire. General Braddock, the commanding officer, ordered his men not to flee and to engage the enemy. Young Washington crisscrossed the front of the battlefield encouraging his ...

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