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Daily Archives: September 11, 2011

Universities fail to spend millions in Ayers money

Miss. universities fail to spend millions from Ayers settlement; funds set to decrease next year Public record shows Mississippi’s three historically black universities in recent years have failed to spend all the funds awarded to them through the Ayers desegregation settlement. The College Board said its intent is that unused funds will carry over for future expenditures subject to legislative ...

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State law, FEMA rules diverge on flood mitigation ordinance

An opinion issued last month by Attorney General Jim Hood reveals a discrepancy between state law and regulations set by the Federal Emergency Management Agency regarding the application of the Flood Mitigation Ordinance that is a big part of the National Flood Insurance Program. Hood’s opinion, issued Aug. 17, says there is a provision in Mississippi law that allows for ...

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Practical not the way to describe government

I’m getting ready to climb out on a limb. For the past few years, I’ve kept my mouth shut and listened to piles of manure being spouted by both sides. I’m not a small government or a big government person. I’m a reasonable government person. In fact, I’m just a reasonable person — practical to a fault. TARP makes me ...

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‘He will be missed’

Award-winning newspaper writer and editor. Entrepreneur. Aide to leaders in the public sector. Community activist. James L. “Buddy” Bynum was all of these things. A former editor and co-owner of the Mississippi Business Journal, Bynum died of pancreatic cancer Sept. 3 at his home in Ridgeland. He was 59. “Buddy was a serious, capable journalist who never lost sight of ...

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Study: Mississippi spends $154 million per year on teen pregnancy

Mississippi’s teen pregnancies cost taxpayers more than $154 million annually, a new study says, the greatest losses occurring due to lost tax revenues, incarceration and foster care. The state has the highest rate of teen pregnancies nationwide, and reducing that percentage is now the top priority of the Women’s Fund of Mississippi, the group that released the study conducted by ...

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This book is about the meaning of flowers and so much more

Before any readers dismiss this book as just a book about flowers or gardening, stop and reconsider. According to Nan Graves Goodman of Jackson’s Lemuria Books, this book is so much more. She says it’s one of her all-time favorite books and will be her number one book to sell for the holidays. “Naturally, because I am a flower lover ...

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ANS honors McGaha

Retired Entergy Nuclear South president John McGaha garnered top industry recognition at the 2011 American Nuclear Society (ANS) Utility Working Conference held in Hollywood, Fla. McGaha, who has more than 32 years of experience with Entergy’s nuclear program, received the prestigious ANS Utility Leadership Award. Given only to a select group of industry leaders in recent years, McGaha’s career achievements ...

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Williams named president

Dr. Alvin Williams has dedicated more than 30 years to the University of Southern Mississippi, and he was recently named president of its Alumni Association Executive Committee. Joining Williams on the executive committee are president-elect Dale Shearer of Ridgeland, vice president Benny Waddle of Hattiesburg, past president Randy Pope of Hattiesburg and Finance Committee chairman Donnie Tynes of Madison. Williams ...

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Anderson joins UMMC

Dr. Chris Anderson, who specializes in adult and pediatric liver and kidney transplants, has joined the University of Mississippi Medical Center, and will see patients through University of Mississippi Health Care. Anderson, a Lucedale native who previously worked at Washington University in St. Louis, Mo., currently leads the kidney transplant program. A summa cum laude graduate of the University of ...

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Squatters, part of a national movement, descend upon Greenville

A real estate headache that has swamped high-foreclosure areas in the U.S. has surfaced in Greenville. The Sovereign Citizens Movement, a group of people who don’t pay taxes and don’t recognize state or federal law or their court systems, has become a nightmare in areas like Atlanta, Florida and the West Coast where forecloses jumped and entire neighborhoods of empty ...

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