Home » NEWS » Ingalls Shipbuilding launches the multi-purpose amphibious assault ship America

Ingalls Shipbuilding launches the multi-purpose amphibious assault ship America

Huntington Ingalls Industries (NYSE:HII) announced today that its Ingalls Shipbuilding division launched the U.S. Navy’s next amphibious assault ship, America (LHA 6), from the company’s floating drydock on Monday.

“Launching a large-deck ship is a significant milestone requiring several highly skilled shipyard crafts and a complex logistics plan,” said Brian Cuccias, Ingalls’ vice president, large deck amphibious ships. “As the Navy’s longtime sole provider of these important ships, we are unique in our ability to draw on the specialized experience our
shipbuilders have in the safe and efficient translation and launch of a warship of this size.”

The ship, weighing more than 29,000 tons in its current state, became one of the largest objects moved across land when it was translated to the drydock two weeks ago. Following additional planning and preparation, the launch process occurred utilizing the drydock’s ballast system on Monday afternoon, and the ship floated free.

“This is an exceptional milestone for the LHA program that was conducted flawlessly,” said LHA 6 Program Manager George Jones. “I am proud of the team who made this happen and who continue to do quality work in this program.”

Ingalls received a $2.38 billion contract to build the next ship in the class, Tripoli (LHA 7), last week. LHA 6 and LHA 7 are the first two ships in the new America class of amphibious assault ships. The ships are 844 feet long and 106 feet wide and will displace 44,971 long tons. The gas turbine propulsion system will drive the ships in excess of 20 knots. They will accommodate 1,059 crew (65 officers) and 1,687 troops. They will be capable of carrying a Marine Expeditionary Unit, including Marine helicopters, MV‐22 Osprey tiltrotor aircraft and F‐35B Joint Strike Fighter (JSF) aircraft. Carrying a complement of F‐35s allows the ships to serve the role of a small aircraft carrier, as demonstrated by LHD‐class ship operations in Operation Iraqi Freedom.

The America class has an increased aviation capacity to include an enlarged hangar deck, realignment and expansion of the aviation maintenance facilities, a significant increase in available stowage for parts and support equipment, and increased aviation fuel capacity.
Similar to its predecessors, the ship will be able to operate as the flagship for an Expeditionary Strike Group. Ingalls has built five Tarawa (LHA 1) class ships as well as eight Wasp (LHD 1) class ships.

Huntington Ingalls Industries (HII) designs, builds and maintains nuclear and non-nuclear ships for the U.S. Navy and Coast Guard and provides after-market services for military ships around the globe. For more than a century, HII has built more ships in more ship classes than any other U.S. naval shipbuilder. Employing nearly 38,000 in Virginia, Mississippi, Louisiana and California, its primary business divisions are Newport News Shipbuilding and Ingalls Shipbuilding.

BEFORE YOU GO…

… we’d like to ask for your support. More people are reading the Mississippi Business Journal than ever before, but advertising revenues for all conventional media are falling fast. Unlike many, we do not use a pay wall, because we want to continue providing Mississippi’s most comprehensive business news each and every day. But that takes time, money and hard work. We do it because it is important to us … and equally important to you, if you value the flow of trustworthy news and information which have always kept America strong and free for more than 200 years.

If those who read our content will help fund it, we can continue to bring you the very best in news and information. Please consider joining us as a valued member, or if you prefer, make a one-time contribution.

Click for more info

About Ross Reily

Ross Reily is editor of the Mississippi Business Journal. He is a husband to an amazing wife, dad to 3 crazy kids and 2 dogs. He is also a fan of the Delta State Fighting Okra and the Boston Red Sox.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*