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This 80,000-square-foot warehouse in west Jackson is home of Seraphim Solar Manufacturing USA's plant.

Cost of converting warehouse for Jackson solar plant $550,000

By JACK WEATHERLY 

The estimated cost of  converting an 80,000-square-foot building at 3111 Lawson St. in west Jackson  into a  solar manufacturing plant will be about $550,000, according to the permit issued by the city of Jackson.

The permit was issued on July 20, less than two weeks after the city announced that it would “partner” with Seraphim Solar Manufacturing USA in what has been called a $50 million investment and that the plant would employ up to 250 jobs in five years.

Evidently, the vast majority of the cost will be in equipment. A source said that equipment to produce solar panels should be arriving on the site soon.

Seraphim Solar announced recently that it would start making the panels in November.

Much work has been done on the building.

Lawson Street Solar Holdings Inc. bought the building for an unknown amount from NB Properties LLC.

Hinds County land records do not show the purchase price, but the market value was listed at $444,680

Terry Nicholas, owner of Warehouse Services Inc., which formed the limited liability corporation, said that the price was more than $500,000, though he wouldn’t say exactly how much.

Most recently, the warehouse building has been used for overflow storage for Warehouse Services’ tenants, Nicholas said.

The city said in a July 8 announcement that it would help the manufacturer – though a city spokesman said recently that it has not signed any agreement. The Mississippi Development Authority has declined to say what kind of incentives it might offer.

The Mississippi Business Journal submitted a records request Sept. 22 in order to see the building permit issued to the general contractor. A copy of the permit was emailed to the Journal on Sept. 25. A&L Constructing LLC was listed as the contractor, confirming what the Journal had reported through unofficial channels.

Section 25-61-5 of the Mississippi Open Records Act states that access to a public record will be provided or denied within one and seven working days after a written request to see the record is made.

Records policies vary from city to city, but limits are set by the Open Records Act.

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