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Ergon possibly linked to Corpus Christi spill

A chemical leak from an asphalt plant that led Corpus Christi officials to warn residents this week not to drink the water was apparently reported a week earlier, according to an email from a state environmental official that was obtained Friday.

The internal email sent Wednesday by Susan Clewis, a regional director for the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality, contained an incident report that described the leak as a “backflow incident from a chemical tank impacting the public water system.” It was reported Dec. 7 at Ergon Asphalt and Emulsions, which is based in Flowood, Miss.

The email doesn’t indicate who filed the report or who received it, but it indicates that the state agency only learned of the leak on Wednesday, when city officials warned the public.

“Obviously we are concerned about that initial report, that this may have been known for seven days and it may have been going on for that long. And why did it take so long for TCEQ to get notified?” asked Luis Moreno, chief of staff for state Sen. Juan Hinojosa, whose district includes Corpus Christi. “Those are all things that I think are starting to be figured out right now.”

Dan McQueen, the mayor of the Gulf Coast city of about 300,000 people, has said local officials also only learned of the leak on Wednesday.

Neither Clewis nor city officials responded to Friday requests for comment.

The TCEQ report indicates that Indulin AA-86 or hydrochloric acid, or perhaps a combination of both, may have leaked into the water supply.

Indulin is an asphalt emulsifying agent that’s corrosive and can cause burning if a person comes into contact with concentrated amounts. It is considered a hazardous material by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration and could cause damage to internal organs.

“You don’t expect to see it in water,” said Terry Clawson, a spokesman with the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality.

Up to 24 gallons of it may have seeped into a pipeline carrying water, allowing it to move to other areas of the city, Kim Womack, a spokeswoman for the city, said Thursday.

Ergon has said in a statement that it has been in contact with the TCEQ and was “working cooperatively to provide all information to ensure state officials can remedy the situation as quickly as possible.” Bill Miller, a company spokesman, declined to explain Friday how a hazardous chemical may have entered the water supply.

State and city officials have referred to a “backflow problem” at the plant, and Womack said inspectors didn’t find a device in place that prevents contaminated water from flowing backward into a potable water supply. Ergon, though, has argued that the plant does have a prevention device, Womack said.

Miller said Ergon Inc. is leasing the property for its manufacturing purposes. The company specializes in the development of engineered paving and pavement preservation products.

Meanwhile, city officials on Friday continued to ease restrictions on the use of tap water while workers flushed water pipes to make sure any remnants of the chemical are removed.

 City officials have said that no one has turned up at area hospitals with symptoms that might indicate they were sickened or burned by the chemical.

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