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Stennis Space Center employees receive 2018 NASA Honor Awards

Stennis Space Center Director Rick Gilbrech and Kennedy Space Center Director Bob Cabana presented annual NASA Honor Awards to Stennis employees during an onsite ceremony.

The late James Bevis of Diamondhead received a posthumous NASA Exceptional Service Medal for 15 years of service as the Stennis chief financial officer until his death in November 2017. Bevis began his NASA career as a budget analyst in 1980. He joined the Stennis team in 1995 and assumed the chief financial officer role in 2002. Bevis provided management and oversight of program and institutional funding of about $300 million annually

Hugh V. Carr, a native of Picayune and resident of Bay St. Louis, received the NASA Exceptional Service Medal for his expertise and service as a NASA environmental specialist since 1988, as well as 11 years of contractor service prior to that time. Carr serves as administrator of the Stennis natural resources program and manager of the NASA-wide Geographic Information System (GIS) Principle Center.

Ralph M. Gonzalez of Gulfport received the NASA Exceptional Service Medal for 35 years of service, including the last 12 in the Stennis Safety and Mission Assurance Directorate. Gonzalez served as a contractor before joining the NASA team in 2006. As a contractor, he implemented a host of new and improved processes that contributed to the success of the space shuttle main engine test project. For NASA, he has served in a variety of safety-related roles, including as the first NASA audit manager at Stennis.

Dwayne K. Stockstill, a native of Picayune and resident of Biloxi, received the NASA Exceptional Service Medal for his career contributions and his work as deputy chief of the Electrical Branch of the Stennis Engineering and Test Directorate. Stockstill has made key technical contributions to the success of the Stennis propulsion test mission. He has served as the lead electrical engineer for the E-1 Test Stand and A-1 Test Stand facilities and as the data acquisition system subject matter expert. He has contributed to a range of high-profile test projects.

Gary L. Bennett of Pearlington received the NASA Exceptional Public Service Medal for 39 years of contractor service at Stennis, including as a facilitator and mechanical technician. He has provided oversight and technical expertise to a variety of activities and projects across the Stennis test complexes, demonstrating an innate ability to grasp and solve complex technical issues, a commitment to quality and a solid work ethic. Bennett has contributed to virtually every propulsion test project at Stennis since the space shuttle.

Marsha L. Ladner of Saucier received the NASA Exceptional Public Service Medal for 38 years of contractor service in various roles at Stennis. She began her career as a drafter and also served as a facility utilization specialist and the NASA Rocket Propulsion Test Program Office liaison. Since 2008, Ladner has served as propellant coordinator, responsible for fulfilling all propellant requirements for Stennis test complexes. Her diligent work and business knowledge has been key to the success of numerous test activities and projects.

Kevin D. Camp, a native of Marrero, La., and resident of Picayune, received the NASA Exceptional Achievement Medal for contributions as a NASA logistics management specialist and Stennis transportation officer. Camp was the key logistic leader in the relocation of the Stennis warehouse operations to Michoud Assembly Facility in New Orleans. As transportation officer, he has been instrumental in managing Stennis’ large fleet of vehicles in an efficient, cost-savings manner. He also has led in Stennis property disposal and equipment yard cleanup efforts.

Aaron T. Mannion of Waveland received the NASA Exceptional Achievement Medal for his leadership in the project to upgrade the Stennis high-pressure industrial water system. Mannion has served as a NASA project manager in the Stennis Design and Construction Project Management Division since 2012. His knowledge and expertise enabled the high-pressure industrial water project to be implemented in an efficient and timely fashion critical to maintaining the Space Launch System test project schedule.

Karen B. Patton, a native of Newton and resident of Pass Christian, received NASA’s Exceptional Achievement Medal for her efforts to identify inefficiencies in the Stennis audit, inspection and surveillance processes and to implement a new integrated internal audit schedule. Patton serves as a facility system safety engineer in the Stennis Safety and Mission Assurance Directorate. Her leadership in developing a new audit schedule has helped eliminate duplication and reduce the number of audits and hours spent on audit activities. Her efforts have earned numerous accolades across NASA.

Jeffrey A. Renshaw of Metairie, La., received NASA’s Exceptional Achievement Medal for his work as lead attorney for the mission-critical Regional Multiple Award Construction Contract Two (MACC-II). The MACC-II vehicle encompasses 24 individual contracts for work at Stennis and various other agency locations. It has been recognized as a groundbreaking success that provides a model for future procurement efforts. Renshaw provided critical legal support to the contract team throughout the effort.

William B. Ritchie of Picayune received the NASA Exceptional Public Achievement Medal for his efforts in modification of the B-2 Test Stand derrick crane, as well as his emergency response and work to repair a damaged natural gas line in a timely and safe fashion. Ritchie helped identify and resolve several issues during the critical derrick crane project. He has provided 11 years of contractor safety support at Stennis and Michoud Assembly Facility.

Jorge F. Figueroa of New Orleans received the NASA Exceptional Technology Achievement Medal for his work as an autonomous systems subject matter expert. A NASA electronic instrumentation systems engineer, Figueroa has led in creation of capabilities now known as the NASA Platform for Autonomous Systems and in the development of autonomous systems at four agency centers. His efforts include guidance of the project to implement autonomous processes in Stennis high-pressure gas operations.

Jack L. Conley of D’Iberville received the NASA Early Career Achievement Medal for his contributions as a NASA mechanical operations engineer since 2011. Conley is an experienced test conductor and propellant transfer engineer, having served in those roles in both the A and E test complexes. He has made major contributions to various test projects and cutting-edge efforts at Stennis and is recognized as an expert in liquid oxygen transfer.

Sarah M. Maine of Slidell, La., received the NASA Early Career Achievement Medal for her work as a NASA contracting specialist and officer since 2011. Maine has contributed significantly to a range of essential services and projects. She currently serves as the CORE contracting officer for the Synergy-Achieving Consolidated Operations and Maintenance contract. Her efforts in that and other roles have contributed significantly to the business goals of the NASA procurement community

Adam W. Murrah of Bay St. Louis received the NASA Early Career Achievement Medal for his work as a NASA environmental specialist since 2012. His efforts have been integral to the success of a number of environmental projects at Stennis, including work on the Area 9 Sanitary Wastewater Treatment Facility. He also serves as manager for both the Stennis Cultural Resource Program and the National Environmental Policy Act. He also was tapped to serve a stint as acting NASA federal preservation officer.

Cheryl A. Timko of Picayune received the NASA Early Career Achievement Medal for her work as a NASA contract specialist since 2008. In that time, Timko has provided an outstanding level of contracting competency, gaining a reputation for quality expertise in construction contracting. She has awarded/administered several construction projects at Stennis and also served as a contract specialist at Wallops Flight Facility. She is a champion of employee involvement and serves on a number of employee teams.

Laurence de Quay of Slidell, La. received the NASA Silver Achievement Medal for his substantial contributions to development and issuance of several critical and complex technical engineering standards at both the center and agency levels. A NASA theoretical simulation analyst, de Quay has served as the Stennis Engineering and Test Directorate manager of technical standards since 2005. He also serves as the Stennis representative on the NASA Engineering Standards Panel.

Justin Junell, formerly of Slidell, La., received the NASA Silver Achievement Medal for his leadership of the investigation into the high-pressure liquid oxygen bleed valve failure on the E-1 Test Stand in July 2017. Junell led all phases of the investigation, creating a comprehensive fault tree and formal lessons learned, which were shared with project stakeholders and the propulsion test community. His efforts were marked by attention to technical detail and exceptional leadership skills.

Karma K. Snyder, a native of Biloxi and resident of Diamondhead, received the NASA Silver Achievement Medal for her work as an aerospace technologist and support of key projects related to propulsion test and test infrastructure facilities. She previously served as the systems engineer for the Space Launch System core stage test activity on the B-2 Test Stand. She has provided extensive support to the center’s range utilization efforts and is one of two people designated as an official range safety officer for unmanned aircraft systems operations at Stennis.

The Rocket Test Facility Co-Location Team received the NASA Silver Achievement Medal for outstanding collaboration and performance in the execution of a critical test program on the B-1/B-2 Test Stand. The NASA/contractor team was assembled to determine if RS-68 testing on the B-1 side of the stand could safely proceed in conjunction with Space Launch System core stage testing on the B-2 side. The team specifically focused on possible hydrogen and air/oxygen blast overpressure from RS-68 testing negatively affecting the core stage. The team developed a process to test overpressure levels and evaluated resulting data to determine that both test projects could proceed safely. Team members included representatives from Stennis, the Rocket Propulsion Test Program Office, Marshall Space Flight Center, the White Sands Test Facility, Aerojet Rocketdyne, Boeing, Syncom Space Services and Bangham Engineering.

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