Great Expectations

by

Published: November 5,2001

In too many businesses, the range of satisfaction for employee performance ranges from superior to marginal to poor. One employee may have an excellent skill set of knowledge and/or technical skills but lacks interpersonal skills. Another may possess wonderful interpersonal skills but be lacking in other needed areas of expertise.

There may be inconsistencies in their work performance ranging from excellent to poor. Sometimes an employee appears to have no redeeming value to the organization.

When asked, “How do I deal with this employee?” I ask, “Why have you chosen to continue giving this person employment?”

The responses are numerous and revealing:

“It’s hard to find good employees.”

“There is a family, friend or business connection.”

“I hate to let an employee go because he needs the job.”

“I find it so difficult to fire an employee.”

“I fear an unfounded law suit based on age, sex, or racial discrimination.”

“I keep hoping the employee will improve.”

The list goes on! The first and most important step in dealing with this difficult employee is prior to employment. Because of time restraints and financial considerations, not enough attention is given to the selection of employees.

A glance at a r

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