Tupelo to annex 2,800 people

by

Published: November 23,2010

TUPELO — A chancery judge has approved Tupelo’s annexation plans.

Attorneys for the city tell The Northeast Mississippi Daily Journal that Chancery Judge Edward Prisock approved on Monday almost all of Tupelo’s proposal, which called for the annexation of just over 16 square miles and about 2,800 people.

Earlier this year, Prisock presided over a 22-day trial in which Tupelo presented its case and opponents, including Lee County, the city of Saltillo and the town of Plantersville, offered their objections.

The newspaper reports that spokesmen for the opponents were unavailable for comment on whether they would appeal to the state Supreme Court.

[RSS Feed] [del.icio.us]



To sign up for Mississippi Business Daily Updates, click here.

One Response to “Tupelo to annex 2,800 people”

  1. Brother Says:

    Does this type situation have a place in the eminent domain law that will be voted on next year, 2011? Some of the people being annexed opposed the move by Tupelo… what percentage I do not know.

    Eminent domain (United States), compulsory purchase (United Kingdom, New Zealand, Ireland), resumption/compulsory acquisition (Australia) or expropriation (South Africa and Canada) is an action of the state to seize a citizen’s private property, expropriate property, or seize a citizen’s rights in property with due monetary compensation, but without the owner’s consent. The property is taken either for government use or by delegation to third parties who will devote it to public or civic use or, in some cases, economic development. The most common uses of property taken by eminent domain are for public utilities, highways, and railroads[citation needed], however it may also be taken for reasons of public safety, such as in the case of Centralia, Pennsylvania. Some jurisdictions require that the government body offer to purchase the property before resorting to the use of eminent domain.
    The term “condemnation” is used to describe the formal act of the exercise of the power of eminent domain to transfer title to the property from its private owner to the government. This use of the word should not be confused with its sense of a declaration that property is uninhabitable due to defects. The latter usually does not deprive the owners of the title to the property condemned but requires them to rectify the offending situation or have the government do it for the owner at the latter’s expense.
    Condemnation via eminent domain indicates the government is taking ownership of the property or a lesser interest in it, such as an easement. In most cases the only thing that remains to be decided when a condemnation action is filed is the amount of just compensation, although in some cases the right to take may be challenged by the property owner on the grounds that the attempted taking is not for a public use, or has not been authorized by the legislature, or because the condemnor has not followed the proper procedure required by law.
    The exercise of eminent domain is not limited to real property. Governments may also condemn personal property, such as supplies for the military in wartime or franchises. Governments can even condemn intangible property such as contract rights, patents, trade secrets, and copyrights. Even professional sports teams may be seized by eminent domain.[1]

POST A COMMENT

 

Twang & Tourism: The Country Music Trail

Our annual "Come See Us" magazine offers ideas for spots in Mississippi ranging from golf to culture to history to food. Click the photo for ideas, stories and access to the digital edition of this year's magazine.

Still planning that summer vacation?

Our annual "Come See Us" magazine offers ideas for spots in Mississippi ranging from golf to culture to history to food. Click the photo for ideas, stories and access to the digital edition of this year's magazine.

FOLLOW THE MBJ ON TWITTER

Top Posts & Pages

%d bloggers like this: