Study looks at ‘typical’ food stamp recipient

by Wally Northway

Published: December 16,2010

Tags: education, food, food stamps, higher education, welfare

STARKVILLE — The myth that a single type of person uses food stamps was examined in a recent Southern Rural Development Center study that impacts how to best reach those in need of food assistance.

The report, “One-size doesn’t fit all: Different reasons drive food stamp use in areas across the South,” looks at certain characteristics of food stamp users in the Borderland in Texas, the Appalachia region in West Virginia, the Delta in Mississippi and Louisiana and the Black Belt in Alabama.

The SRDC is housed at Mississippi State University. This research was performed by Tim Slack and Candice Myers of Louisiana State University. They looked at the extent to which regional and local conditions uniquely affect SNAP use.

The study found that there is not a single set of demographics that defines a person as a typical user of what has formerly been known as food stamps and is now called Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, or SNAP.

The Appalachia region reports the highest percentage of SNAP use, at nearly 22 percent. In this region, the majority of recipients are white female heads of households.

In the Borderland, higher numbers of single-mother households and nonworking-age populations are enrolled in SNAP.

In the Delta, greater numbers of children and elderly take part in SNAP. Also in the Delta, fewer adults without a high school diploma are a part of SNAP compared to other areas of the country.

In the Black Belt, SNAP use is linked most often to nonworking-age individuals and those living in racially segregated areas than in other parts of the country.

“This type of study helps fine-tune the delivery of food assistance programs to key areas of the South that are in greatest need of these types of programs,” Beaulieu said.

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3 Responses to “Study looks at ‘typical’ food stamp recipient”

  1. Mike Says:

    BUT

    its easier for blacks to get welfare and food stamps, do a study about that now.

    more blacks get it and more easier because they dont work, they refuse to work, the only way they make a living is selling the you know what, hence why they all got these new paint job cars, $600 wheels, $500 stereo system built into it.

    Yeah I rest my case.

  2. Mot Says:

    I used to work for the DHS in the days of “food stamps”. I do not know how these people came up with the conclusion that white women were the largest recipients of food stamps, but I do know that part of their report is hogwash! It’s laughable! Maybe I’m color blind and can’t tell the difference between white & black? Also, I just wonder how a true comparison would show the number of black children as compared to white children. However, it’s doubtful there would be a “true” comparison.

  3. ashley Says:

    The only reason it is easier for black people to get benefits is because they have at least 5 kids or more each and they do not know who the “baby daddy” is or the “baby daddy” is to darn lazy to get a job. I mean they live in shacks and drive luxury cars. Sell that car and buy a good old used car that runs good for a couple thousand and buy some groceries with the extra. The whole reason they have so many kids is so that they can draw $1000 SNAP a month plus a welfare check on all their kids cause the daddy is not going to pay child support.

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