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Published: December 7,2012

Tags: Arlington, Ingalls, Navy

The amphibious transport dock Arlington (LPD 24) returned from successful U.S. Navy acceptance sea trials in November. The ship had an opportunity to steam in formation with Anchorage (LPD 23) while at sea. (Courtesy Huntington Ingalls Industries)

PASCAGOULA – Huntington Ingalls Industries announced today its Ingalls Shipbuilding division has delivered the amphibious transport dock Arlington (LPD 24) to the U.S. Navy. Arlington is the eighth ship in the LPD 17 class of ships Ingalls has delivered to the Navy.

“The delivery of LPD 24 caps an outstanding year in our amphibious shipbuilding programs,” said Ingalls’ LPD Vice President Doug Lounsberry. “LPD 24 is the third ship we’ve delivered within a year, and it is a testament to the work ethic and dedication of our LPD shipbuilders. We are receiving tremendous feedback from the Navy on how the ships in this class are performing. It’s a hot production line right now, and we are ready to build more.”

Ingalls has three more LPDs in various stages of development or construction. Built to be survivable and flexible, these complex warships enable the services to carry out their missions without constraints or additional assets.

The ship is scheduled to be commissioned in the U.S Navy fleet sometime next spring.

The 11 ships of the LPD 17 class functionally replace more than 41 ships (the LPD 4, LSD 36, LKA 113 and LST 1179 classes of amphibious ships), providing the Navy and Marine Corps with modern, sea-based platforms that are networked, survivable and built to operate with 21st century platforms, such as the MV-22 Osprey.

The LPD 17-class ships are 684 feet long and 105 feet wide and displace approximately 25,000 tons. Their principal mission is to deploy the combat and support elements of Marine Expeditionary Units and Brigades.

The ships can carry up to 800 troops and have the capability of transporting and debarking air cushion (LCAC) or conventional landing crafts, augmented by helicopters or vertical take-off and landing aircraft such as the MV-22. These ships will support amphibious assault, special operations or expeditionary warfare missions through the first half of the 21st century.

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