Carter: Recreational ‘shooters’ in for pointless persecution after Aurora

First, a whack- job congressman from Texas, Louie Gohmert, went on the radio and blamed Friday’s mass murders at an Aurora, Colo., movie theater on our nation’s increasing “godlessness.”

Absurd, of course. But Rep. Gohmert’s mutterings shouldn’t actually bother us. He’s just the crazy old uncle we keep up in the attic.

What should bother us is that the crowds are massing in village squares to voice their displeasure with America’s firearms owners. The first sign came Friday morning with media reaction to a National Rifle Association Tweet likely scheduled hours before the shooting rampage:

“Good morning, shooters. Happy Friday! Weekend plans?” went the Tweet.

Taking on its self-appointed role of Miss Manners, the media immediately noted the crassness of the greeting.

I know my intellectual shortcomings forced me do a couple stints in summer school, but since when are “Good Morning” greetings bad manners? OK, it wasn’t the greeting itself. It was the identity of those receiving the greeting.

“Shooters” – which is no different than referring to basketball players as “ballers,” prize fighters as “boxers” or to members of AC/DC as “rockers.”

It is what they are.

But “shooters?”

Look for the media to make them an unwelcome segment of society in the days ahead.

It’ll be overlooked that “shooters” are just regular folk. They’re the woman who is in front of you in the supermarket line or the man at the bank who writes up your car loan.

They are the everyday people I encounter on weekends at the state-run Turcotte shooting range on Highway 43 up near Canton.

The place has given me hours of joy since I discovered it earlier this year. From the repeat visitors I see on Saturdays and Sundays, I’m not alone in that.

“Thanks for coming,” says Reno the range-master when I go to check in, never failing to extend a hand in greeting. He says the same as I check out a few hours later.

The “shooters” are the most considerate folks I’ve encountered in Mississippi. We’re all our brother’s keepers when we step onto the range.

To me, nothing engages my senses and puts me in “the now” like sighting in my target, taking the rifle off safety and pulling the trigger. I’ve come to think of it as my Happy Hour (s), especially if I’m hitting my targets.

I own a semi-automatic variant of the Kalashnikov, or AK-47.

It’s a dog-ugly rifle (see photo) that you never saw John Wayne use.

But I have come to love mine dearly. I hope to grow old with it.

President Obama made note of the despair we all felt after Friday’s tragedy: “Such violence, such evil is senseless.”

Well said, Mr. President.

We can hope – but probably to no avail – that the media listened: An evildoer did the violence. Not the “shooters” at Turcotte or the ones who received the good morning greeting.

 

Leave a Reply

  1. Thanks for getting my point. Sadly, my prediction of great hand-wringing by the media came true over the weekend.
    Best,
    Ted

  2. The congressman’s reference to “increased godliness” is not absurd. Many in our country have accepted as OK lifestyles and activities that are just plain wrong. The more children who are not raised to live “Godly” lives, the higher the odds are that one of them will decide to commit such a terrrible act.

    The NRA supports gun use and ownership in the right way, not in a way that promotes senseless violence.

  3. Why does anyone need an battlefield assault weapon? People need hunting weapons, target weapons, and weapons for protection. But not battlefield weapons.

  4. To say “Godlessness” is the cause is to say “the devil made me do it”. I don’t think all people who commit a crime are possessed anymore than I think all people who don’t are saved. Regarding the instrument used,…there are guns to protect yourself from someone and then there are guns like the one pictured used in the assault and in this article that no person should possess. As was stated in a prior post, why would anyone NEED such a weapon? And given how easily they and their 100 bullets per minute clips can be be attained, we shouldn’t be so surprised the next time such an incident happens.

  5. In that case, Ed, let us strive to keep swords, slingshots, and long sticks out of peoples’ hands. After all, those have all been battlefield weapons!

    You’re not the arbiter of what I “need.” You statement is just as preposterous as saying “people don’t really need to gather in groups of more than five or six people, do they?” Or, “people don’t really need to have all these varieties of religious worship options, do they?” If you don’t want an assault rifle, Ed, don’t buy one, but you’re being awful presumptuous by unilaterally deciding what people “need.”

    Ted, of course there was hand-wringing. People get paid to wring said hands.