St. Dominic’s McDaniel first to use Ocelot Device to help in treatment of peripheral artery disease

November 13, 2012

Health Care

Dr. Huey B. McDaniel

St. Dominic Hospital’s cardiovascular surgeon Huey B. McDaniel, MD became the first in the nation to commercially use the Ocelot Device that helps treat peripheral artery disease.

The event happened Nov. 8.

St. Dominic’s is the only hospital in Mississippi where the Ocelot device is available.

Ocelot, a new, sophisticated imaging technology tool designed to help patients suffering from Peripheral Artery Disease (PAD), was recently cleared for use by the FDA. Physicians at St. Dominic’s are experts in the use of this device, as they were among the first to use this new technology.

“We constantly strive for a better way to treat patients with PAD and we want to stay on the cutting edge of medical care,” said Huey McDaniel, M.D.

The Ocelot catheter allows physicians to see from inside an artery during the procedure, using optical coherence tomography. This is a significant advancement because in the past operators had to rely on x-rays and touch and feel to guide the catheters through blockages. With the Ocelot system, physicians are able to more accurately navigate the catheter.

A procedure, using the Ocelot system, is a minimally invasive treatment designed to allow patients to leave the hospital within hours, and return to normal activities within days.

PAD affects between 8 and 12 million adults in the United States. It is caused by a build-up of plaque in the arteries that blocks blood flow to the legs and feet. Symptoms of PAD are often dismissed as normal signs of aging and may include painful cramping, numbness, or discoloration in the legs and feet. More than 200,000 amputations occur each year as a result of PAD, and many could be avoided with the use of this new technology.

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