Target offers card holders free credit monitoring as fraud reaction grows

Target’s recent effort to regain the trust of its shoppers after a credit card security breach seems to have backfired. Customers, it seems, are still on edge when it comes to the retailer, the Huffington Post reports.

tagret logoThe company was the victim of a security breach during the holiday shopping season that compromised around 40 million customer credit cards. In response, Target sent an email to those who may have been affected by the breach offering a year’s worth of free credit monitoring and identity theft insurance. The services are offered through Experian and can help prevent customers from being victims of credit card and identity theft.

Credit scores will not be included in the free monitoring. Experian and the other credit monitoring companies — TransUnion and Equifax — will try to sell you an additional service that provides your credit score. Target advises ignoring the pitch unless you want to pay to see your scores or any additional reports.

Many of the potentially victimized Target customers believe the email credit monitoring offer is a hoax. It’s not.

“[The email] is an official communication,” a Target spokesperson told The Huffington Post in an email. Here’s what Target shoppers received:

Target’s recent effort to regain the trust of its shoppers after a credit card security breach seems to have backfired. Customers, it seems, are still on edge when it comes to the retailer, The Huffington Post reports.

The company was the victim of a security breach during the holiday shopping season that compromised around 40 million customer credit cards. In response, Target sent an email to those who may have been affected by the breach offering a year’s worth of free credit monitoring and identity theft insurance. The services are offered through Experian and can help prevent customers from being victims of credit card and identity theft.

But many of those customers believe the email is a hoax. It’s not.

“[The email] is an official communication,” a Target spokesperson told The Huffington Post in an email. Here’s what Target shoppers received:

Meanwhile, millions of consumers are being sent new credit and debit cards in the wake of the recent security breach that hit as many as 110 million Target customers, CNN Money reports.

JPMorgan Chase  announced Tuesday that it is replacing 2 million credit and debit cards due to the hack. Other major issuers haven’t released the number of cards they’re replacing, but did confirm they are sending new cards to certain customers.

Bank of America (BACFortune 500) and Wells Fargo (WFCFortune 500) both said they are reissuing cards that they believe are “at risk of” fraud, while American Express (AXPFortune 500) said it has replaced “a small number” of cards — mostly at the request of customers. “Card replacement is not something we typically do in large numbers, as we feel it can inconvenience customers,” spokeswoman Marina Norville said.

Citibank (CFortune 500) confirmed Thursday that it is replacing debit cards affected by the Target hack. Read the full  story.

In Washington, Democratic U.S. lawmakers are pressing for information on Target’s breach. Sen. Jay Rockefeller of West Virginia, chairman of the Commerce Committee, sent a letter to Target CEO Gregg Steinhafel requesting a briefing for the panel’s staff on the “circumstances that permitted unauthorized access” to card dat, Bloomberg News reports. In the House, Maryland Rep. Elijah Cummings asked Darrell Issa, the Republican chairman of the Committee on Oversight and Government Reform, for a hearing.

 

, , ,

No comments yet.

Leave a Reply