Home > capitalism, Economic development, economy, Gov. Haley Barbour, Healthcare, Local Government, politics > LAST AGAIN — Mississippi ranked No. 50 in latest reading and math scores

LAST AGAIN — Mississippi ranked No. 50 in latest reading and math scores

November 1st, 2011

We have done it again … Mississippi is ranked 50th in the nation in an education-related subject.

Will the next governor be able to improve on this score?

The good news is that Mississippi improved its score in both reading and math from 2009, but not enough to make up ground on West Virginia at No. 49. Mississippi did rank ahead of the District of Columbia in both categories. Massachusetts ranked No. 1 in both categories with scores of 46 and 51, respectively. Mississippi scores were 21 in reading and 19 in math while the national average were 32 and 34.

>> RELATED STORY: Barksdale gets it when it comes to education

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Below is a state-by-state look at the percentage of eighth-graders who scored at or above reading and math proficiency levels on the National Assessment of Educational Progress, which is administered by the Education Department’s National Center for Education Statistics. Proficiency levels in both subjects are shown for both 2009 and 2011, with reading scores in the first two columns and math scores in the next two.

2009 2011 2009 2011
Jurisdictions at or above proficient in reading at or above proficient in reading at or above proficient in math at or above proficient in math
National public 30 32 33 34
Alabama 24 26 20 20
Alaska 27 31 33 35
Arizona 27 28 29 31
Arkansas 27 28 27 29
California 22 24 23 25
Colorado 32 40 40 43
Connecticut 43 45 40 38
Delaware 31 33 32 32
Dist. of Columbia 14 16 11                                17
Florida 32 30 29 28
Georgia 27 28 27 28
Hawaii 22 26 25 30
Idaho 33 34 38 37
Illinois 33 34 33 33
Indiana 32 32 36 34
Iowa 32 33 34 34
Kansas 33 35 39 41
Kentucky 33 36 27 31
Louisiana 20 22 20 22
Maine 35 39 35 39
Maryland 36 40 40 40
Massachusetts 43 46 52 51
Michigan 31 32 31 31
Minnesota 38 39 47 48

>>MISSISSIPPI 19 21 15 19
Missouri 34 35 35 32
Montana 38 42 44 46
Nebraska 35 35 35 33
Nevada 22 26 25 29
New Hampshire 39 40 43 44
New Jersey 42 45 44 47
New Mexico 22 22 20 24
New York 33 35 34 30
North Carolina 29 31 36 37
North Dakota 34 34 43 43
Ohio 37 37 36 39
Oklahoma 26 27 24 27
Oregon 33 33 37 33
Pennsylvania 40 38 40 39
Rhode Island 28 33 28 34
South Carolina 24 27 30 32
South Dakota 37 35 42 42
Tennessee 28 27 25 24
Texas 27 27 36 40
Utah 33 35 35 35
Vermont 41 44 43 46
Virginia 32 36 36 40
Washington 36 37 39 40
West Virginia 22 24 19 21
Wisconsin 34 35 39 41
Wyoming 34 38 35 37
DoDEA 39 39 36 37
  1. November 3rd, 2011 at 09:04 | #1

    Article states miss scores went up. Chart shows scores went down. Why?

  2. Ed Clynch
    November 3rd, 2011 at 10:22 | #2

    We need an organized pre k education system. Look at other southern states who have organized pre k. For instance look at the Georgia scores.

  3. Calvin Lucas
    November 4th, 2011 at 19:01 | #3

    Gee, maybe we are using a strategy that doesn’t work all that well. A tax structure that doesn’t generate much revenue results in limits on funding. Schools without enough resources turn out people who are not competitive; those guys then go on to elect more legislators that do the same about revenue and results. Guys, this is not working. Time to try something radical and different, like more taxes and better funded schools.

  4. November 4th, 2011 at 19:39 | #4

    In the article author Ross Reily asks the question..
    “Will the next governor be able to improve on this score?”

    Good question, but is it a question we should be asking about our next Governor? Is it his job to improve education? What exactly is the job of a governor?

    stan@msvoterblog.com http://msvoterblog.com/?p=188

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