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Archive for the ‘Art/Entertainment’ Category

Arts Alive set for May in Jackson’s Smith Park

March 8th, 2012 Comments off

Arts Alive will take place May 4-5 at Smith Park in Downtown Jackson.

The music, arts and crafts festival is a free festival that promotes both performing and visual arts. It also stimulates the Jackson Metro area to support and boost downtown and it raises awareness of homelessness and supports local charitable organizations such as Stewpot Ministries.

It’s hosted by Galloway United Methodist Church, St. Andrew’s Episcopal Cathedral, and Cathedral of St. Peter the Apostle

For more information on Arts Alive, go to www.artsalivejackson.com

Mississippi’s impact on the Academy Awards as well as the arts world

February 29th, 2012 3 comments

Morgan Freeman at the Governors Ball following the 84th Academy Awards on Sunday in the Hollywood section of Los Angeles.

At one point during the Academy Awards presentation last week, I was taken aback by the indelible mark Mississippi and Mississippians were making on the film industry at that very moment.

Sure everyone knew about “The Help”, and wondered if the Kathryn Stockett book, then turned into a movie could pull the upset and win for Best Picture. And yes, we all were keenly aware of Octavia Spencer winning an Oscar for her role in that movie.

But, there was more — much, much more.

Our own Morgan Freeman — a winner of an Oscar for acting and a cast member of three Best Picture winners, not to mention his best movie, “Shawshank Redemption,” which is recognized as one of Top 100 movies of all time — was the leadoff hitter for the show as a presenter.

“The Muppet Movie” (remember Jim Henson) won an award, and then the academy recognized Mississippi natives James Earl Jones (that’s Darth Vader to my kids and Terrance Mann to me) and Oprah Winfrey (no description needed) with Oscars.

Their awards were part of the Governors Awards, which were launched three years ago.

With Mississippi in the midst of boosting its image among film big shots as part of a Creative Economy campaign, the state couldn’t have had a bigger and more positive night in the spotlight.

I don’t have any particular numbers to back this up, but I would suspect that Mississippi — per capita — had a bigger impact on the Academy Awards in 2012 than any other state in America.

Add that to our world-wide impact on literature as well as the music industry and there is a case to be made that Mississippi should be considered to have had the most positive historical influence on arts in America — ever.

Fortune tellers may be the key to economic progress

December 9th, 2011 Comments off

Headlines in every newspaper across the country seem to give conflicting information on the current status and the future of the world economy.

We are left to wonder when, if ever, we will ever come out of this — what seems to be never-ending — economic slowdown.

One day you read that the governments of Europe are in such a bind with the Euro that everyone’s economic system is going straight down the tubes.

The next day, you read that a limit in paying state taxes by big business will help ease the pain.

Then, it’s back to Europe where leaders feel a new plan will make everything better.

At home last week, Southern Motion announced it is expanding operations in Baldwyn. The reclining furniture manufacturer’s announcement was good news for Northeast Mississippi, which has been reliant on the furniture industry the last 20 years.

The next day, though, the Northeast Mississippi Daily Journal reported that furniture maker KI will lay off 70 employees in north Mississippi as it closes its Pontotoc factory and converts a second in Tupelo to a warehouse.

What gives? Up, down. Opening a business, closing a business.

You need a fortune teller to figure out all of this.

But wait. Hattiesburg’s city council may have the answer for everyone from Egypt, Miss., to, well, Egypt.

In a stroke of genius, Hattiesburg’s city leaders have repealed a ban on fortune telling.

OK, a federal judge ruled their old ordinance unenforceable, but with so much of an unforeseen future, Hattiesburg has made the right call.

Economic leaders from across the world can come to Hattiesburg to talk with Sister Marie. If president of Spain has a long life line, then his country is going to pull out of this thing. If not — well — let’s not talk about that.

But, maybe it’s not that simple.

We have to wait 120 days before the ordinance is repealed.

That’s far too long.

Mississippi, as well as the U.S. and the rest of the world, cannot wait 120 days for information that could put civilization back in normal working condition.

Hattiesburg’s City Attorney Charles Lawrence says it will take the 120 days to get new regulations in place, such as zoning restrictions.

Restrictions my foot.

There should be a fortune teller on every corner if it means we can put people back to work and money back in retirement accounts.

Donald Trump should bring this up at the next Republican presidential debate. Our future depends on it.

But, then again, the fortune tellers already knew that.

What happens when you mix Okra and Gorillas?

December 9th, 2011 Comments off

Here at the Editor’s Notebook, we are Delta State football fans.

So, don’t forget that Delta State’s Fighting Okra or, if you prefer, Statesmen (or, as one of my 5-year-old son’s best friends says — FLYING YOKRA) will be playing in the national semifinals.

DSU will be on the road this week against a team with my second favorite nickname (you probably already know my favorite) — the Pitsburg (Kan.) State Gorillas.

How great is that? Makes me wonder why there are more gorillas out there. I hear the school makes a ton of money every year from jersey and apparel sales. Now that’s the 500-pound gorilla in the room (sorry, terrible pun).

Anyway, you can catch the Okra and the Gorillas at 6 p.m. Saturday on the ESPN family of channels. At my house, it will be ESPN GamePlan.

Enjoy the game and …. GO FLYING YOKRA!!!

Going to West Point for Rotary Club visit

December 7th, 2011 Comments off

As we are trying to put the finishing touches on the MBJ’s printed edition for Dec. 12 (Monday), I am also preparing to travel to West Point tomorrow (Thursday) for a visit with its local Rotary Club.

I am looking forward to going and talking with the group. I have a lot of family and friends in the area. So, I am sure it will be a lot of fun.

I get to chat with civic organizations from time to time. Having been the program director, once upon a time, for the Greenville Rotary Club, I know it is hard to come up with quality programs on a week-in and week-out basis.

What a quality program is to one person may not be to another, but if other civic groups or any organization are looking for a program, I, or someone from the Mississippi Business Journal, will be happy to add it to our calendar.

I am always looking to preach the gospel of the MBJ. So, give me a call at 601-364-1018 or e-mail me at ross.reily@msbusiness.com.

I’ll let y’all know how everything goes in West Point.

Mississippi photographer/writer Franke Keating dies at 95

November 4th, 2011 Comments off

Greenville’s Franke Keating, known world-wide as one of the most celebrated photographers for National Geographic, died Friday in Atlanta at 95.

Franke Keating, who died Friday, may be best known as a photographer for National Geographic Magazine and her coffee table book of photos from around the state of Mississippi.

Keating had lived in Atlanta recently with her son, Dr. John Keating, since her health had begun to fail.

“She was a special lady,” Greenville realtor Betsy Alexander said. “It is a sad day for Greenville.”

Having traveled across the globe to some of the world’s most exotic locales, including 17 trips to Kenya, Keating was known throughout Mississippi as an extraordinarily talented portrait photographer, having shot some of the area’s most well-known families and authors. She also shot for The Smithsonian and Travel and Leisure as well as smaller publications across America.

But to many around Greenville, she is simply known as “Ms. Franke.”

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“Franke lived her life fully,” said long-time friend Jan Engel. “She was always ready to go. She had more energy than I did. My family loved her dearly, and anyone who knew her loved her.”

A member of the Greenville community for more than 60 years, Franke Keating originally grew up across the river, in southeast Arkansas. In 1939, Keating married the love of her life, Bern, and moved to West Palm Beach, Fla. The couple relocated to Utica, N.Y., before Bern joined the U.S. Navy, and subsequently fought in World War II.

The Keatings returned to the South after the war, eventually settling in Greenville, where the couple opened a studio, which thrived on freelance and magazine contract work.
Initially, Bern was at the photographic helm of the business, but Franke longed to become more involved with the art. Eventually, the couple would switch roles, leaving Keating more in the photographer’s seat, and her husband took over the writing aspect of their work.

Franke with Parker Reily at the 2007 Keating Cookie Party

The couple traveled the world over the next 50 years, flying off into the wild blue yonder, traveling to far away lands, going on safari and meeting new and exciting adventures head on.

In 1995, Franke and Bern received the Special Achievement Award from the Mississippi Institute of Arts and Letters.

Keating’s importance to Greenville and the Delta is reflected in the comments of Greenville mayor Heather McTeer, who viewed her as an icon.

“She was an amazing woman, who showcased the Delta with her talents,” McTeer said. “I loved her adventureous side. She was a classic lady but was unafraid to go anywhere, or meet anyone.

“I also loved her grace. I usually saw her at local arts events and everytime, she always gave me a warm hug and kiss on both cheeks. Mrs. Keating was really special to Greenville.”

One of the things Franke loved the most was her Christmas cookie party, a Delta tradition for more than 50 years.

Franke and Bern up with the idea for the Cookie Party after visiting the home of a friend one Christmas where they admired the beautiful ornaments on the tree.  The Keatings decided to open their home and have children come to decorate ornaments for the birds to enjoy to be hung on trees in their yard. Over the years, the event grew to be more of a grownup party.  But Franke says she wanted a tradition for the children, “not a cocktail party!”

It was then that Franke literally sketched out several designs.  She took her drawings to a local blacksmith shop and had cookie cutters made.  To her surprise, the blacksmith made the cookie cutters out of copper. She promptly told him not to send her the bill until after New Year’s; she didn’t want to spoil her holiday.

When my family and I lived in Greenville, we were always invited to the Cookie Party, and my children always enjoyed the fun and frolicking at Ms Franke’s

Franke was one of the kindest and most talented people I ever met. She will be greatly missed.