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For the love of Pete, somebody take Southaven mayor Greg Davis out behind the woodshed

February 15th, 2012 Comments off

Southaven mayor Greg Davis addresses questions during an interview from his home in Southaven this week. Southaven aldermen say they want an internal audit of city finances to get a more in-depth look than the one provided by the routine annual audit. The Commercial Appeal reports a newly formed committee plans to initiate the review in the wake of ongoing questions over Mayor Greg Davis' spending. (AP Photo/The Commercial Appeal, Stan Carroll)

Seriously?

Greg Davis wants to pin blame on his alderman for him being an idiot?

The only thing the Southaven Board of Aldermen should have done differently in the last several months is for one of them to have taken their mayor out behind the woodshed for a lesson in humility and humanity.

Apparently, Southaven mayor Greg Davis believes he has done nothing wrong in regard to deals involving a Florida condominium he co-owns with a developer who has received more than $3.4 million through real estate dealings with the city since 2008, a fire station that could cost taxpayers up to $4 million because of an unusual no-bid contract negotiated by Davis, and other recently reported transactions.

Why?

Because, he says, the city’s aldermen approved all transactions.

>> ORIGINAL POST: Embattled Davis blames alderman for approving transactions …

I suppose if the alderman had known ahead of time that the mayor had been running around using the city credit card on items from a Canadian sex shop (and why wasn’t it an American sex shop?) or was dropping $1,000 tips at a Ridgeland restaurant as he picked up the tab for state legislators, then maybe they would have stopped, dropped and said, “No way we are taking this deal you piece of garbage.”

By the way, has anyone wondered which legislators went to dinner with Davis that night?

As it stands, the aldermen are guilty of believing everything Davis ever said during his political campaigns about truth, family and the American way.

Well, that will never happen again.

Davis has used all of his political capital and probably all of his personal capital as well.

Remember, Davis was absent from city business on a 30-day leave for medical treatment when most of the dealings were uncovered and is under criminal investigation for misuse of city funds after being ordered by the state auditor to repay about $170,000.

And for all of the group therapy and extensive psycho-education he picked up during his 30-day leave, I am not even going to insult your intelligence by reprinting Davis’ quotes, blaming everyone but himself in this fiasco. He even believes he has done what is in the best interest of the citizens.

So, which is it?

The aldermen should have known he was a lying, cheating sack of, uh, beans, or he is a good, upstanding guy that is doing the work of the people.

As for those credit card reimbursements that led to the repayment order from the state auditor, Davis said he could not discuss it because of the ongoing state and federal investigation.

“I just want the public to be patient and wait because all the facts will come out,” Davis said.

After everything else that has come out, you really think he wants more to come out now?

My guess is Davis doesn’t believe in karma.

Please, somebody, one of you aldermen do the right thing and teach the mayor a lesson.

Then again, maybe some time in jail would be good for the mayor. I suspect that would be a much more — how should I say? — educational experience.

Idaho writer needs a Mississippi education

April 8th, 2011 Comments off

Don’t believe the notion that Mississippi has a bad public relations image? Then you might want to check out the following March 30 headline from the Times-News in Twin Falls, Idaho.
“Idaho looking up at (gulp) Mississippi”
A column from opinion editor Steve Crump went on to hammer our fair state, beginning the ranting with:
TGFM. Thank God for Mississippi. Every educator, politician, public health worker and economist in Idaho has uttered that phrase at one time or another.
Crump’s diatribe is a warning to Idahoans after the U.S. Bureau of Economic Analysis that the annual average income in Idaho was $32,257 last year, second worst in the nation, just ahead of — you guessed it — Mississippi.
Our average yearly salary was $31,186.
Many of Crump’s points were valid, but some were mean spirited and way off base.
First a few of the valid points, which Crump used as bulleted items, to show readers where Idaho trails the Magnolia State.
>> Mississippi has a lower rate of binge drinking than Idaho.
>> Idaho spends less per pupil on public schools than Mississippi — a lot less. The difference is $970 per student.
>> Mississippi has lower corporate, individual and unemployment insurance taxes than Idaho.
>> Idaho trails Mississippi in the disparity in salary between men and women.
>> In the past decade, Mississippi’s per capita personal income has grown half-again as fast as Idaho.
>> Idaho has a lower immunization rate than Mississippi.
>> Mississippi has a higher percentage of its citizens who check their cholesterol than Idaho’s residents.
>> Idaho has a higher underemployment rate than Mississippi.
>> Although both states received “Ds,” Mississippi finished higher than Idaho in Education Week magazine’s most recent rankings. In the category standards, assessment and accountability, Mississippi received a “B;” Idaho got a “C.” Mississippi also got higher marks in school finance and teachers.

Low blows
Then there were the cheap shots:
If this continues, no Idahoan is gonna be able to go out of the house without a Confederate flag over his or her head.
I mean, have you been to Mississippi?
The humidity is so bad it’s like walking around in concrete overshoes. You have to change your shirt three times a day.
The roads are terrible, the politicians are crooked, the drivers are drunk (10.35 DUI fatalities per 100,000 people, as opposed to 4.67 in Idaho), fire ants and cockroaches are everywhere, and the food?
Crump went on to clobber our food based on a compilation of recipes for a book put out by the “Mississippi Fish and Wildlife Foundation,” which is a really named the Mississippi Department of Wildlife, Fisheries and Parks.
But who’s keeping score?
Anyway, the cookbook listed recipes for Squirrel Cacciatore, Rabbit Ravioli, a few others as well as what Crump called his personal favorite of Coon a la Delta.
I am a true Mississippian, with a public school Delta education, and no true expertise as a chef. I mean, I cut classes at Delta State University to clean squirrels and help make squirrel stew for the all the guys in my dorm. So, what do I know?
But I do know Mississippi’s resident food expert John T. Edge from the Southern Foodways Alliance. Edge is the author or editor of more than 10 books, including “Cornbread Nation: the Best of Southern Food Writing.” He also writes for many publications, including the New York Times.
He says his his son, Jess, won’t eat souse or trotters. Neither will his wife, and according to Edge, this situation frustrates him and he sees no resolution forthcoming.
I emailed Edge to ask his thoughts of Crump’s column.
“This doesn’t seem smart enough to dignify with a reply.” Edge emailed back. “What does Idaho know?”
For the record, I gave Crump an opportunity to respond for this column, but he did not reply to email and phone messages.
This isn’t the first time folks in other regions of the country have taken pot shots at our state to make their states look better.
Last year, Michigan Gov. Jennifer Granholm, while defending tax increases said, “Now is the time to stand up for those priorities. What we’re fighting for is Michigan not becoming Mississippi.”
New York’s Charles Rangel also made less-than- thoughtful comments of us a couple of years back.
As I have said before, we must do a better job of educating folks about our wonderful slice of the South.
It should be pointed out that whatever music Granholm or Rangel or even Idaho’s Steve Crump of the Times-News listens to likely was born in Mississippi.
Every major form of music in America got its roots in Mississippi — from Elvis Presley and rock n roll in Tupelo to country and western in Meridian to blues and jazz in the Mississippi Delta.
Maybe Crump and others should be reminded of the great literature and writers who have come from Mississippi — from Faulkner to Welty.
We also have a great journalism tradition ranging from Pulitzer winners of the 1940s at the Delta Democrat Times to a 2006 at the Sun Herald of Biloxi.
Surely, if Crump had known all of these things, he might not have been so quick to hit below the belt.
Having said that, there are plenty of well-documented reasons — education, racial tensions, etc. — Mississippi isn’t always at the top of the popularity list.
Crump and others should be admonished for the childish comments made, but we must be honest with ourselves.
There’s a long way to go, and people like Granholm and Rangel and Crump wouldn’t have made the comments they made if there we didn’t have a problem with perception.

Contact Mississippi Business Journal editor Ross Reily at ross.reily@msbusiness.com or (601) 364-1018.

What is the answer for healthcare?

February 1st, 2011 Comments off

The philosophy behind a Florida judge’s Monday ruling that the Obama administration’s health care overhaul is unconstitutional is fair.

U.S. District Judge Roger Vinson questioned whether the government was reaching beyond its power by requiring citizens to buy health insurance because everyone needs medical care.

Under that logic, Vinson said, the government could force Americans to buy clothes or food, siding with 26 states fighting the much-maligned measure.

But what is the answer?

What we have had isn’t perfect either.

I visited with a small business owner in Jackson a few weeks ago. He has been in his business at the same location nearly 10 years. However, he cannot afford health insurance for his family.

This is a college-educated person with two other people in his office, and they all have to fend for themselves.

How is it that if you choose to work for a larger business, you will be afforded health insurance by your employer, but if you start your own business, particularly a small business, health insurance become a luxury?

We always say that America’s economy is built on the backs of the small business owner. At what point will we break their backs?

There are no simple answers, but for everyone who has screamed and hollered for the last year about “Obamacare”, I am interested in hearing what the solution is for healthcare problems in America.

From this vantage point, it seems we are penalizing those who are working hardest to provide for themselves.

Let me know what you think …