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Posts Tagged ‘Frank Besson’

More oil rigs in Gulf than before BP oil spill

February 4th, 2011 Comments off

According to The Times Picayune in New Orleans …

While a backlog of drilling permits in Washington continues to feed oil industry angst, new data shows that more rigs are in the Gulf of Mexico than before the BP oil spill, indicating that operators might have more confidence in the future than they are letting on.

While only 34 of the 125 rigs in the Gulf are actually working — half the total that were active before the Macondo well blowout — the vast majority of the idle rigs, particularly those slated for big-ticket jobs in deepwater, will remain under contract for the rest of 2011.

The latest tracking information from ODS-Petrodata, a Houston-based compiler of oil and gas data, shows there are 10 more rigs in the Gulf now than there were last April.

While only 34 of the 125 rigs in the Gulf are actually working — half the total that were active before the Macondo well blowout — the vast majority of the idle rigs, particularly those slated for big-ticket jobs in deepwater, will remain under contract for the rest of 2011.

In the shallow-water Gulf oil fields, where the government has never officially banned drilling but has issued few work permits in the past several months, activity has rebounded to near its pre-blowout levels.

There are 26 shallow-water rigs operating now, just 11 fewer than before the BP blowout, according to ODS-Petrodata. In December, the government issued seven shallow-water drilling permits, matching the monthly average from the year leading up to the BP disaster.

There are also signs of renewal in the more lucrative deepwater fields.

Haley’s been soaking his head in oil

June 5th, 2010 Comments off

Gov. Haley Barbour told a group of mostly native Mississippians today (Saturday) that the oil tragedy in the Gulf of Mexico isn’t as bad as the media is making it out to be.

“It’s really more of a nuisance,” he said.

Really?

Barbour made the comments at the Mississippi in the Park event at Central Park in New York City.

Does he really believe that?

Nearly 40 percent of the Gulf of Mexico is closed to fishing and boating; oil is inundating the marshes of Louisiana and is beginning to wash ashore in Mississippi, Alabama and Florida.

I suppose nuisance is one way to describe it, but I suspect only folks that are trying to downplay the effect of this tragedy would use that term.

Gov. Barbour has no sense of urgency about this event and hasn’t since Day 1.

While Mississippi has not seen the devastation to evironment and wildlife that Louisiana has to date, there is no guarantee those conditions will hold.

It really is quite striking that Gov. Barbour would even be in New York when he should be on the ground on the gulf coast monitoring the situation.

During the immediate aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, Gov. Barbour was famous for going on national television and anywhere else, for that matter, and telling everyone how Mississippians are “hitching up their britches,” to get through the tragedy.

Maybe it’s time Gov. Barbour hitch up his britches and make sure the Mississippi Gulf Coast is protected from an event that could prove to be far more costly than Hurricane Katrina in the long run.

Back in the office, Northway to tell story of the Coast

May 6th, 2010 Comments off

Mississippi Business Journal senior reporter Wally Northway is back from a day on the Mississippi Gulf Coast, where he talked with residents from bay St. Louis to Ocean Springs about the potential for disaster associated with the oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico.

He also spent the afternoon on a media boat that toured some of the affected waters.

“The fight to stave off the massive oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico and protect the Gulf Coast’s delicate ecosystem was more than evident,” Northway said.

Look for his story here Friday and in the print edition of the Mississippi Business Journal, which will be available in newsstands Friday afternoon.

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