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Mississippi ranks next to last in nation on new measure of opportunity in America

November 28th, 2011 Comments off

The State of Mississippi has placed next to last in the nation, ranking 50th, on a new measure designed to indicate how effectively individuals living in a state can move up the economic ladders of society as compared to the rest of the country.

>> RELATED STORY: Mississippi is fat and stupid

>> RELATED STORY: Mississippi last in reading and math

>> RELATED STORY: Health, education key to Mississippi economy

The measure, called the Opportunity Index, pulls together more than a dozen data points to rank every state by awarding a first of its kind Opportunity Score. The Index is designed to empower community leaders, engaged citizens, and elected officials at all levels to become knowledgeable of the overall opportunity they are providing to those living in their region. It will be issued annually, giving leaders a way to track progress and measure the effectiveness of their efforts. Developed jointly by Opportunity Nation and the American Human Development Project, the Index is available online, for free in a user-friendly and interactive format at www.opportunityindex.org.

“Opportunity Nation starts from the belief that the zip code you’re born into shouldn’t pre-determine your destiny,” said Mark Edwards, executive director of Opportunity Nation. “For too long we have sliced and diced the interconnected issues of education, jobs, families, and communities – the framework underlying the idea of opportunity – into narrow silos that are disconnected. The reality is that these factors work in tandem to determine the potential success of our citizenry. That’s what the Opportunity Index provides – an unprecedented snapshot of what opportunity in America looks like at the local, state and national levels.”

MISSISSIPPI LANDS NEAR BOTTOM

Mississippi landed next to last in the nation, earning an Opportunity Score of 29.8 out of 100. Only the state of Nevada fared worse. The state ranked lower than national averages in 13 out of 16 categories. A few of the trouble areas that Mississippians struggle with include:

· Poverty Plays a Role: Mississippi has the lowest median household income in the country, at $36,796, and the highest poverty rate in the nation at 21.4%. It is one of three states in the nation where median household income is lower than $40,000 per year

· Not Part of the Information Superhighway: Mississippi has the lowest score for high-speed internet access, with only 43.5% of households having high-speed internet.

· Room for Improvement in Education: Mississippi has a significantly lower percentage of on-time high school graduates (64%) than the national average (74%). It is also falling behind in college graduates with only 19% of the population holding a bachelor’s degree. The national average is 27%.

“Having scored at or below the national average in many of the metrics used to formulate their Opportunity Score, Mississippi residents have much work to do before they can say they provide their residents with opportunities to improve their lives,” said

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Will Madison Mississippi be the next Silicon Valley?

November 11th, 2011 Comments off

Where will the Internet’s next greatest business be born?

That’s what Business Insider set out to find.

While most people immediately associate the phrase “start-up” with Silicon Valley, or New York, the fact is that there are millions of budding entrepreneurs outside of America’s existing technology centers.

As broadband spreads into rural areas and small towns across the United States, economies are emerging in places that haven’t been considered viable markets by traditional investors and hardware manufacturers looking for areas to expand.

That is about to change.

According to the United States Census Bureau, small towns, cities, and counties with 10,000 to 50,000 residents are considered “micropolitan statistical areas.”

Sometimes, these are college towns filled with young Mark Zuckerberg wannabes who have grown up using all of the gadgets that drive today’s economy.

These young Turks of suburbia can’t remember life without the Internet, and many have viable ideas that, with a little love and mentoring from a tech-savvy angel investor or two, could become successful technology businesses.

Doubt this? Consider the fact that many colleges and universities with computer science and engineering curricula require students to write mobile applications or develop engineering prototypes for various classes.

Unfortunately, more times than not, all the student is left with at the end of the semester is a good grade and pat on the back.

Science and technology programs at these schools aren’t structured to provide institutional help in finding investors or even teach tech students how to market their great ideas.

But the fact is that it’s easier to teach a computer engineer how to become a marketer than it is to teach a marketer how to become a computer engineer. All of these dormant apps and technology projects represent a huge untapped market of intellectual property. Investors just need to know where to look.

With this in mind, Business Insider dug deep into the U.S. Census data and discovered 20 micropolitan areas that meet certain demographic requirements for a budding technology economy. These factors include a high level of broadband accessibility, a sizable workforce (in relative terms), a vibrant local economy, and the presence of a small college or university.

>> CLICK HERE FOR THE LIST

Interestingly, all of these locations have unemployment rates as much as five points below the national average, and the top five have a broadband availability rate of 100 percent. Even though the list is ranked from one to twenty, all things being considered, each of these locations present equal opportunities.

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Groupon’s losses narrowing

October 21st, 2011 1 comment

As we talked about several months ago, Groupon ain’t as sweet as many would make it out to be. … So take a look at this story today that says Groupon reported nearly breaking even in its third quarter, an important milestone as it prepares the final leg of its long journey toward an initial public offering.

Changes hit Laurel Leader-Call but newspaper industry holds important place

September 2nd, 2011 1 comment

Every time, I have a tough day at work, I take a look at the trailer for “Page One” about the New York Times, and I get a little more energized. While I haven’t seen the complete documentary yet, I understand that regardless of what happens in new world media, serious newspapers will always have a place in this world.

Do we really think Facebook is going to cover your local Board of Supervisors meetings?

I think not.

So, Friday, when I saw the Laurel Leader-Call is changing from seven-day to a four-day publication, I was saddened, but I know — deep down — that newspaper will be OK.

The economy and new world media may have eaten away at profits during the years, but do we really think the local TV station is going to cover everything that Laurel has going on? Oh yeah, there is no local TV station in Laurel. Are all of the folks on Facebook in Laurel going to hold the mayor accountable with investigative stories? I’m saying no.

And in 140 characters or less, will the tweeters of Laurel be able to handle the news of the day?

The fact is your local newspaper, while it may not be The New York Times or the Chicago Tribune or the Washington Post, it probably does a pretty good job of keeping you up on the real news affecting the area readership. Reading the stories about the board of supervisors or the local police department may not always be riveting, but it’s the local newspaper everyone calls when they feel like there is a fly in the ointment of local government.

Newspapers, like the Laurel Leader-Call, are a necessary part of our everyday lives. Don’t believe Facebook or any other new media will take its place.

Hey Steve Jobs, it’s like the iPad was my idea!

April 7th, 2010 Comments off

My wife owns the laptop in our family, which is the modern day version of the saying she wears the pants in the family.
I have to ask permission to get minutes on the portable computer or be relegated to working on our big-screened dinosaur in our closet of an office.
So, in order to continue to be a member of the family during evening hours I have become pretty capable at surfing the web on my iPhone.
Yes, my iPhone. I can’t live without it. I read the news of the day in the morning by using my apps from the New York Times, Associated Press, Huffington Post, Wall Street Journal, Business Week, CNN and USA Today.
For my Boston Red Sox fix, I read scores and more from the Boston Globe.
Yes, the screen is pretty small, but it gets the job done.
Ah, then Apple CEO Steve Jobs heard me from afar. It’s like the iPad was my idea (sorry for the poor reference to the inferior competition’s product lines).
Make a giant iPhone that isn’t a phone at all.
Poof.
The iPad.
Apple latest creation is just that, an iPhone without the phone and much bigger, but not as big as a laptop, easier to carry around.
So, last Monday after the much-ballyhooed release that weekend, I spent part of lunch lusting after the gadget at the local Apple Store.
Held it in my hand, typed in www.msbusiness .com, read the latest news on our site just like it was a laptop, but better.
The price tag, compared to a laptop, is better, too.
My lunchtime visit was like walking through the auto dealership and eyeing the new car you want.
It’s pretty to look at and you can afford it it if you really want it, but how much do you want it?
Not sure just yet.
I may make a few more trips to the Apple Store for a test drive just to see what kind of gitty-up it has, maybe kick the tires and look under the hood.
You know you can never be too careful about these things.
But then again, if my wife is reading, my birthday is just a few weeks away (ahem!).

Contact Mississippi Business Journal editor Ross Reily at ross.reily@msbusiness.com or (601) 364-1018.