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Posts Tagged ‘Phil Hardwick’

Hardwick offers some Facebook drawbacks

August 15th, 2011 Comments off

In his usual great blog, Phil Hardwick offers some enlightening information about Facebook, which can bee seen here.

Phil Bryant does it again

August 3rd, 2011 Comments off

In a video interview with the Mississippi Business Journal, Lt. Gov. Phil Bryant, whom we endorsed for governor, said he would like to see a new nuclear power plant at the Grand Gulf site in Mississippi.
Really?
Well, I would love to see a NASCAR track built in Mississippi, but I don’t have a plan in place to make that happen, and even if I did, it would take 20 or 30 years to get it done.
Oh, that was Phil that said he wanted a NASCAR track in Mississippi but offered no specifics on how to get it done?
Sorry.
Hey, I’ve got a great idea.
Since Monsanto is all about changing the natural order of seeds to make money, maybe the world’s largest loan shark would manipulate a seed so that it only produces money. Then, Mississippi could just grow money and not worry about anything else.
Oh yeah, Monsanto already did that.
It’s called the corn plant.

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When all is said and done, ‘Snarky’ Planet Money got it right

July 14th, 2011 Comments off

Adam Davidson, an NPR reporter on “Planet Money,” has received a pile of criticism for his look into the economic development industry, in which he finally concluded, “They are not creating jobs. They are just moving jobs around.”
From there, everyone became defensive and lost perspective as the story received a rebuttal by International Economic Development Council president Jeffrey A. Finkle and pointed criticism by NPR.
“This American Life” senior producer Julie Snyder and Davidson attended a meeting of the International Economic Developers Council in San Diego and came away saying, “Now we have this race to bottom: Who can cut back government services the most? Who can eliminate the most regulation?”
In his rebuttal, Finkle said, “I feel even more hurt by the piece as I rolled out the red carpet for you guys. It is as if I held a dinner party, invited you as guests, told everyone how important you were and then had you insult all of my guests.”
Ira Glass, the show’s host and one of its editors, lamented that the tone in the report had gotten out of hand and “that the tone was a bit snarky.”
But was the report accurate?
It is not the job of a reporter to make people feel warm and fuzzy; it is to report accurately with insight and perspective.
In this case, Davidson and Snyder lost their audience with a “snarky” tone, but when you dig beneath the surface, they had a point.
It did a great job discussing the “numbers” gaming aspects, short-term focus, and special interests of economic development organizations.
One urban planner commented that over years in the business, she is “frankly weary of boosterism.”
Many ED organizations out there are doing a fine job and in some forms in a tough economy, but the planner pointed out the she has experienced, “first hand the spin and lack of substance to many of the claims made in the field. I have been astonished at reports to the community claiming this or that ‘win.’ ”
My thought is there was a point made in the story, even if it was lost in the hurt feelings of those involved.
But the overwhelming point, which no one rebutted, was the conclusion of the report where Davidson noted, “education is the key and we are cutting off our legs by de-funding it from K to college.”
Sound like any place you know?

Contact Mississippi Business Journal editor Ross Reily at ross.reily@msbusiness.com or (601) 364-1018

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••• UPDATE to the update: The ‘hoarding’ of American wealth

January 31st, 2011 Comments off

••• UPDATE — An economist of some note, who chooses to remain anonymous, forwarded me some more information on the hoarding of wealth in American … Please read and let us know what you think

••• cbpp-ms-income-inequality-2008

••• cbpp-pulling-apart-state-analysis-income-trends-2008

From Monday …

I have come across the term hoarder (or hoarded) a couple of times today. The first I thought was interesting, the second kind of made me stand up and take notice.

The first came from someone who formerly wrote a column for me at a different newspaper. … The text and link to which he refers is included.

The second was included in Phil Hardwick’s blog on our website.

Enjoy, and let me know what you think …

Hoarder comment No. 1

For some reason, I was motivated today to read FDR’s First Inaugural Address. A link to it is below, and I suggest that you read it carefully and see how 1929-1933 is so congruent with 2007-2011.

Franklin Roosevelt saved capitalism by excoriating those who were perverting it and calling them out. They called him a socialist, but he saved the country.

One would think that the 1930s would have convinced Americans for all time that “trickle-down” economics is ultimately a disaster.

The moneychangers, as Roosevelt called them, are not philanthropists concerned about the average American. Cutting their taxes does not produce more jobs; it produces more hoarded wealth and higher annual bonuses.

They are today’s perverters of capitalism, and they must be called out as Roosevelt called them out.

http://www.bartleby.com/124/pres49.html

Hoarder comment No. 2

Speaking of small business, I couldn’t help but raise my eyebrows at this post from Gene Marks blog in the New York Times:

BEST CASE AGAINST LOBBYISTS Huffington Post’s Zach Carter and Ryan Grimm write about how the small-business lobby hurts small business: “Two years into the Obama administration, small businesses are still struggling to obtain credit and hire new workers, while big businesses withhold payments from them, horde cash and enjoy record profits. But if the top small-business goal for the past two years was to elect Republicans, the N.F.I.B. has done its job.”

See Phil Hardwick’s blog …