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Posts Tagged ‘unemployment’

Boyce Adams either lying or uniformed when it comes to his key issue — the Kemper County Coal Plant

November 7th, 2011 Comments off

Why won’t Boyce Adams answer questions about his main talking point in the race against Brandon Presley for northern commissioner of the Mississippi Public Service Commission?

He has gone on the record several times, saying there will be no rate increase involved with the building of a $2.88 billion coal plant in Kemper County. Yet, when we called him this past week to ask him about it, he didn’t return multiple phone calls.

Boyce Adams has said there will be no rate increase invoved in the building of the Kemper County Coal Plant

In a story we ran in this week’s Mississippi Business Journal, Presley views the plant as a job-killer while Adams was quoted two weeks ago in A Northeast Mississippi Daily Journal story reports Adams as saying, “There is no rate hike associated with the project.”

RELATED STORIES …

••• KEMPER PLANT KEY IN HEATED PSC RACE

••• Bentz: The whole Kemper story is not getting told

••• Poultry association: Kemper could cost jobs in Mississippi

••• Topazi talks — ‘About a third’ really means ‘about a half’ where rate increases are concerned with Kemper Coal Plant

••• Public record or corporate secrets — PSC to decide whether public should be privy to matters concerning their pocket books ahead of corporate concerns of confidentiality

••• Kemper plant — Yes or no?

••• Presley pulling for Kemper, but admits it is a huge risk

••• Sierra Club sues to stop Kemper

••• The Kemper Project: What to expect

Brandon Presley has said he opposed and voted against the $2.8 billion Kemper Coal Plant and against the 45 percent rate hike

••• Kemper technology could be proving ground for a plant in China

••• BGR website changed following MBJ story on Kemper Plant

••• (VIDEO) Kemper County welcomes coal plant

••• (VIDEO) Anthony Topazi on the Kemper County Coal Plant

According to a 2009 document filed with the Commission, the Kemper plant could make customer rates go up by about 45 percent. Mississippi Power Company told poultry farmers that their rates would rise by 30 percent.

So, when it comes to rate hikes involved with the Kemper coal project, Adams is either lying or uninformed. In either case, that is unacceptable for someone basing his entire candidacy on the worthiness of the Kemper County Coal Plant.

From my perspective, I am sorry that we cannot provide people with a response from Adams about this issue. However, we have been calling him for nearly a week without a return phone call.

If he needs to clarify his position, he can reach me at (601) 364-1000.

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Crowds storm Ridgeland Apple store for new iPhone 4S; still plenty available

October 14th, 2011 Comments off

The Ridgeland Apple store began selling the new iPhone 4S this morning as people began lining up to get the new gadget late last night.

Arris K shows off the new iPhone 4S at the Apple store in Ridgeland Friday morning.

The iPhone 4S is the latest in the company’s line of “Jesus Phones,” which includes many under-the-hood improvements.

Apple has been on the mind on many recently, despite of the new iPhone, because of Steve Jobs, Apple’s co-founder, who died last week following a battle with pancreatic cancer.

In many places, Apple fans created makeshift memorials to Jobs that included flowers, photos, iPad boxes and apples (as in the fruit)

The iPhone 4S initially was panned by critics, who said it was more of a facelift to the iPhone 4 than a new product. The phone’s exterior looks the same as its predecessor, but the guts are new. Inside there’s a faster A5 dual-core processor, an improved 8 megapixel camera and a voice assistant named Siri, who will respond to voice commands and answer questions.

Apple CEO Tim Cook helped unveil the 4S last week a day before Jobs’ death.

Pre-orders of the phone started on October 7 and beat expectations. Apple sold 1 million in the first 24 hours via its website and carriers AT&T, Verizon and — for the first time — Sprint. By comparison, Apple reported 600,000 iPhone 4 pre-orders last year in 24 hours, but that included orders placed with overseas carriers.

The iPhone 4S went on sale Friday at all 245 Apple stores in the U.S., in addition to the following countries: Australia, Canada, France, Germany, Japan and the United Kingdom. The new iPhone will be available in 22 additional countries by the end of October, Apple says.

According to officials at the Ridgeland store, despite the early rush of people buying the new product, there are still plenty of new iPhones left for everyone else who managed not to sleep on the sidewalk outside the store.

Good news appears to be outweighing the bad

April 2nd, 2010 Comments off

It’s always dangerous to write about a certain trend in stocks, but as of this writing, stocks are on the verge of going above 11,000 for the first time in more than 18 months.
A lot of that recently is on the backs of tech stocks as Apple and Verizon jumped after The Wall Street Journal reported that Apple was making phones that could be used on Verizon’s network.
Having said that, Mississippi’s unemployment has risen again to 11.4 percent with the largest increase in the nation during the last month.
So, it is hard to really jump for joy when so many, particularly here in our state, are still hurting badly.
But there is room for good news, like:
• Mississippi is on track to exceed its projected monthly tax collections for the first time in more than a year and a half.
State Tax Commission spokeswoman Kathy Waterbury said last week that collections were about one-quarter of 1 percent — or $1.2 million — ahead of where experts predicted they would be in March.
• Viking Range is reporting an uptick in sales for the first time in more than a year.
• In our business, advertising sales seem to heading back in a positive direction.
• A steady climb in stocks over the past two months could give investors reasons to collect some profits. The Dow had risen 22 of the past 25 days and is now at its highest level since Sept. 2008.
And, the index had its best first-quarter performance since 1999.
Stocks have now had a nearly unbroken advance since early March of last year. The Dow made an even larger leap of 7.4 percent in the fourth quarter.
• An incentives war touched off by Toyota boosted sales at most major automakers last month.
GM reported a 21 percent jump in new vehicles sales last week, while Ford’s climbed nearly 40 percent over last March, when economic uncertainty and rising unemployment kept buyers from showrooms. Sales at Hyundai and Subaru also rose, but Chrysler continued to struggle with sales down 8 percent.
• A government report showing initial claims for unemployment benefits fell last week added to the market’s enthusiasm following upbeat manufacturing reports overseas. In the U.S., a trade group’s report signaled that manufacturing is growing faster than expected.
So, while we aren’t out of the woods just yet, there are plenty of indicators, just in the last week, to suggest that the worst of times is certainly behind us.

MBJ editor Ross Reily can be reached at (601) 364-1018 or ross.reily@msbusiness.com

Michigan vs. Mississippi: Let’s get it on!

October 9th, 2009 Comments off

It is really easy to fall into the trap of trashing Michigan Gov. Jennifer Granholm after her recent barb at Mississippi.
According to the Gongwer News Service, Granholm was defending tax increases this week when she said, “Now is the time to stand up for those priorities. What we’re fighting for is Michigan not becoming Mississippi.”

Let’s throw the stats at her. … Mississippi has the 33rd lowest unemployment rate in the country at 9.5 percent while Michigan has the highest at 15.2 percent, according to the August statistics from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.
“Shame on you Governor Granholm,” Mississippi’s State Senator Dean Kirby, a Republican who is chairman of the Senate Finance Committee, wrote in an e-mail. “Have you compared your tax structure to that of Mississippi? Have you ever been to Mississippi? Shame, shame shame !!”

Shame, Shame, Shame !!!!!

OK, now let’s take a look at the real issue here — perception.

We still have a perception problem. Folks around the country view us as uneducated and backwoods.

We know that’s not true.

But it wasn’t so long ago that New York’s Charles Rangel made similar comments that enraged us all. Instead of firing back, we must do a better job of educating folks about our wonderful slice of the South.

It should be pointed out that whatever music Granholm listens to likely was born in Mississippi.

She should be reminded that every major form of music in America got its roots in Mississippi – from Elvis Presley and rock n roll in Tupelo to country and western in Meridian to blues and jazz in the Mississippi Delta.

Gov. Granholm should be reminded of the great literature and writers who have come from Mississippi – from Faulkner to Welty.

We also would like to point out the great journalism tradition that we have in Mississippi ranging from Pulitzer winners of the 1940s with the Delta Democrat Times to a 2006 Pulitzer winner in the Sun Herald of Biloxi.

Mississippi is a wonderful place, and we would like the opportunity to show everyone what we are talking about.

Many of us in Mississippi have visited Michigan and been treated wonderfully. We would like to show Gov. Granholm the type of hospitality we can extend.

Certainly, Gov. Granholm would not have made the insensitive comments she has against Mississippi if she had spent any significant time here.

Having said all of that, there are plenty of reasons that Mississippi isn’t always at the top of the popularity list.

We all know the reasons — education, racial tensions etc…

While we are right to defend ourselves against the ignorance of the Rangels and Granholms of the world, we must be honest with ourselves.

We have a long way to go, and people like Granholm and Rangel wouldn’t have made the comments they made if there we didn’t have a problem with perception.