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Personhood lesson: Freedom of speech a right that should be employed with dignity

Those who have taken up arms for the United States have given and preserved precious freedoms. One of those is the freedom of speech.

So let’s compare how two of Mississippi’s most recognizable elected officials chose to exercise that freedom when they discussed right before Tuesday’s elections their views on the Personhood amendment, or Initiative 26.

On Monday, Nov. 7, Congressman Gregg Harper was the speaker at the monthly luncheon of the Stennis Capitol Press Corps. When he ended his 20-minute speech, I asked him how he planned to vote on the three ballot initiatives the next day, just like I asked the two agricultural candidates and treasurer candidate Connie Moran before that. Harper said he would vote “yes” on all three, and acknowledged that it “would probably upset some people.”

Here is what Harper said, verbatim, about 26:

“I was surprised (at the amount of opposition to it). I thought it would be a slam dunk early on. I believe life begins at conception. That’s not a hard vote for me in that situation. Planned Parenthood is good. Politically they know how to get things done. If you read that language, and I’ve talked to some OB-GYNs and some other medical folks — nobody, if they’re honest, believes that it will keep a woman from getting birth control pills or stop in vitro fertilization. It won’t stop a doctor from saving the life of the mother if there’s an ectopic pregnancy. Those are things designed to create a stir over an issue.

“But I don’t want to lose sight of this: If I don’t stand up for the life of that unborn child, who’s going to do that? What’s more important? I understand a woman’s right to her body. But I’m also going to say, ‘does that child have any rights whatsoever?’ If we look at the breakdown on most abortions, the overwhelming majority are elective procedures because the mama doesn’t want to have the baby. I think that if we don’t stand up, nobody else is, and I think the process and procedure (of abortion) has been very harmful to our country over the decades.”

Now let’s look at how then-Lt. Gov. and now-Gov.-elect Phil Bryant addressed 26 in an appearance Nov. 4 on an American Family Association radio show. The entire seven-minute interview won’t be transcribed here verbatim because the back-and-forth between the host and Bryant, who is the co-chair of the Yes on 26 Committee, would run into the thousands of words. To listen to the entire interview, click here:

“I just believe that this is one of the reasons I was here,” Bryant said, “that Personhood was our opportunity to say loud and clear to people all over America that we want to end abortion in our time, and I want to stop it here in Mississippi. I believe I was led here by the Lord to help take up this cause, to say that this is something you’ve got to stand for no matter what the political temperature or how the winds blow at you. We want to stand firm for life and I’m just honored to be a part of it, and I believe we’re going to win on Tuesday.”

The host of the show asked Bryant how he felt about Gov. Haley Barbour initially expressing concerns about 26’s ambiguity before revealing a day or two later, at a get-out-the-vote rally for Bryant, that he had indeed voted for the measure. Bryant replied, and I’m paraphrasing, that it was obvious that Barbour had prayed about the matter before voting. Bryant added that we’re still debating some parts of the U.S. Bill of Rights 200 years later, the debate over 26 was no different, and that he appreciated Barbour saying at his event that he had supported 26 with his vote.

The host then suggested that divine intervention had a lot to do with Barbour voting absentee for 26, so he could provide a pre-Election Day jolt to its chances of passing. That’s when Bryant’s tone changed.

“This is a battle of good and evil,” he said. “Let’s just make it plain. There is the evil side, the dark side of the forces, Satan and those that would love to continue to kill children while they’re still in the womb, are out there using every effort that they can, anything at their disposal. Now even in these times, if you talk too much about the fact that evil that does exist, people think there’s something wrong with him. What times are we living in when it is politically incorrect for someone to say that Satan has a hand in this? And you’ve got to understand that we’ve got to fight against the gates of hell to prevail here, and that’s exactly what I’ve been saying. I think when I say those things, I see people recognizing the fact that this is a Biblical battle of good and evil.”

Precisely the same view, wildly different ways of explaining it. One way is clearly better than the other; and it has nothing to do with political correctness, and everything to do with being polite, dignified and respectful.

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