Squatters part of national movement descend upon Greenville

September 11th, 2011 No comments

A real estate headache that has swamped high-foreclosure areas in the U.S. has surfaced in Greenville.

The Sovereign Citizens Movement, a group of people who don’t pay taxes and don’t recognize state or federal law or their court systems, has become a nightmare in areas like Atlanta, Florida and the West Coast where forecloses jumped and entire neighborhoods of empty houses were left unattended.

What happens is SCM members file bogus quit-claim deeds in local court systems – the same systems they claim not to recognize – and begin to homestead in empty houses. That’s exactly what’s happened in Greenville, said Realtor Betsy Alexander.

Alexander has been trying to sell a home on Bayou Road in Greenville since the owners moved out of state. She got word over the weekend that the previously empty home became occupied over the Labor Day holiday, and not by its rightful owners.

But the unwanted occupation, and all the fringe elements like animal waste and general filth that come along with it, aren’t the biggest problem.

“This is essentially paper terrorism,” Alexander said in an interview last week with the Mississippi Business Journal. “Let’s say I got an offer on the house today. The sale process could be held up for who knows how long because these people have filed a bogus deed, and unraveling that would be a nightmare. People think getting identity theft straightened out is bad. That’s nothing compared to this. Once you file a deed with a court, it’s extremely difficult to un-file it. And it affects people up and down the line, the insurance, the banks, the title, in this case the homeowners, and me, the Realtor. It’s awful.”

“What these people do generally is focus on foreclosed homes,” Alexander continued. “They don’t think banks should own houses so they file these fake quit claim deeds and just move in. They claim ownership of everything in the house – furniture, toiletries, everything. This is the first instance of this that I know of in Greenville.”

Alexander said the SCM members who took over her client’s home have been arrested, and had their initial court appearances last week. Each of the four members is charged with burglary and grand theft. As of Thursday afternoon, each remained in jail.

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Court wants to examine new workers’ comp appeal law

September 6th, 2011 1 comment

For the second time in a month, the Mississippi Supreme Court has called into question the constitutionality of a new law designed to streamline the appeals process for disputes arising from administrative decisions.

The court has asked for briefs related to a law the Legislature passed last session that provides for a direct appeal to the state’s high court in workers’ compensation cases. Old law mandated an appeal to a decision rendered by the Mississippi Workers Compensation Commission first go to a chancery court.

The Supreme Court has asked for briefs from Attorney General Jim Hood and Sysco Food Services and its insurance company, which are involved in the dispute. The briefs are due the second week of September.  The Court entered a similar order in July asking for briefs related to the constitutionality of a new direct-appeal law for certificate of need decisions made by the Mississippi State Department of Health.

At that time, Mississippi College law professor Matt Steffey told the Mississippi Business Journal a law designed to remove one stop in the court process “quite unusual.” The Supreme Court asking for briefs related to either, Steffey said, indicates it has some serious reservations about it passing constitutional muster.

The workers’ comp bill’s successful run through the Capitol to Gov. Haley Barbour’s desk is something Perry Nations has worked, he said, five years to see happen.

“We figured there might be a challenge to it at some point because you’re bypassing a level of the court system,” said Nations, executive director of the Associated General Contractors of Mississippi.

His affinity for the bill, Nations said, is its design that has the potential to save his members time in the court system and money on legal fees, and to ensure a faster reward for an injured employee. He noted that there exists a statute that allows workers’ comp issues to be expedited through the trial court system, but that rarely is true.

“In actuality, probably the average time of the appeal to the courts from the commission is anywhere from one to three years,” Nations said.

That backlog has a multiplier effect down the line.

“Sometimes we run five or six years behind on getting (fiscal) years closed,” Nations said. “We’re still closing some years in the ‘90s waiting on all these cases to settle. This would allow us to settle our books, and we’ll know where we stand quicker. I know it’s a legal decision, but I think it would be a good business decision.”

Ron Aldridge, executive director of the Mississippi National Federation of Businesses, took a more lukewarm approach.

“We watched it (during the legislative session) but we didn’t go out on a limb on it this time,” he said. “In the past we’ve opposed it, but that was prior to seeing some of the statistics (on how many cases were appealed eventually to the MSSC) on it. We were concerned at the time that you would lose the ability to go to a local court on the front end. Once we saw those statistics, and it became clear that the vast majority had their appeals exhausted, it was hard to fight it.”

Law requires any company with five or more employees to carry workers’ comp liability insurance.

“It’s a routine thing,” Aldridge said. “It can be a lot of headache.”

Billy Ware, president of Mid-State Construction in Jackson, said his company has 65 employees, and that what he called “problem cases” arising from workers’ comp are rare.

“That said,relief is never timely,” he said. “It’s a good thing when you can take a level of the court system out of it. This could certainly speed up the process. It’s probably not something I’ll have  ton of personal involvement in; but from a business standpoint, it makes a lot of sense.”

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Economic development special session set for Friday (Updated)

August 29th, 2011 No comments

Gov. Haley Barbour announced this morning that there will be a special session Friday for lawmakers to deal with an incentive package for at least one economic development project, maybe two.

The details of each will not be unveiled until Wednesday.

As is his custom, Barbour released little to no details about the projects. He said it will be Wednesday before we’ll know if lawmakers will deal with an incentive package for one project, or two.

“We’re not sure the other will be ripe by Friday,” Barbour said. If it isn’t, it will be at the top of the list for the regular session that starts in January, he said.

When the Legislature passed that $420 million bond bill toward the end of the last session, there was some money earmarked for future economic development projects, with the intent of having the money in place to avoid a special session. Barbour said Monday morning that neither of these projects was eligible for that. When the bill passed in April, Barbour said he was under the impression that one of the projects was going to Ohio, and the other wasn’t even on the radar.

“Both of these involve large (private) capital expenditures and large job numbers,” Barbour said.

That’s about all we know right now.

UPDATE: This may provide a clue about at least one of the projects, from the Columbus, Miss. Commercial Dispatch: http://www.cdispatch.com/news/article.asp?aid=12724&sort=d#ixzz1WXRsSp6S

Current, former committee chairmen: Dept. of Revenue not adhering to intent of bill

August 28th, 2011 No comments

The two committee chairmen who ushered through the Capitol a bill they thought would clarify tax liability-calculation rules for Section 42 housing developments said last week the Department of Revenue had been ignoring the bill’s intent.

Passed during the legislative session in 2005, Senate Bill 3100 directed tax assessors to use the income capitalization approach when figuring the ad valorem tax bills for Section 42, or what are commonly called affordable rental housing, developments. The income capitalization method takes into account all income derived from a development, including the revenue from sales of federal tax credits developers are awarded for building Section 42 housing.

Shortly after Gov. Haley Barbour signed the bill in 2005, the then-State Tax Commission amended its Land Appraisal Manual to preclude tax credit-sale revenue, which can run into the millions of dollars, from the assessors’ calculations. The only income they could count was whatever rent tenants paid. Because the federal government caps the rent on Section 42 housing, the ad valorem tax liability was limited.

The Mississippi Association of Supervisors, the Mississippi Municipal League and a few dozen cities and counties have sued the Department of Revenue (formerly the State Tax Commission) in an effort to allow the tax credit-sale revenue to be counted. The lawsuit was filed in Hinds County Chancery Court.

In the complaint, the plaintiffs allege the loss of tax money tied to the sale of tax credits has created an unfair financial burden, and that the Department of Revenue has been ignoring legislative intent since shortly after the 2005 bill became law, when the agency’s Land Appraisal Manual was amended.

House Ways and Means Committee Chairman Rep. Percy Watson, D-Hattiesburg, and former Sen. Tommy Robertson, who chaired the Finance Committee in 2005, said last week that the bill they started on its path to Barbour’s desk intended for revenue generated from the sale of tax credits to be counted in the overall tax liability configuration.

“It was not our intent that the legislation be interpreted the way the tax commission interpreted the bill,” Watson said in an interview with the Mississippi Business Journal. “It was a matter of them implementing it in a way different than the way we had drafted the bill.”

In the 2010 legislative session, Watson’s Ways and Means Committee sent a bill to the House floor, where it passed, that would have exempted 35 percent of the revenue generated from Section 42 housing from ad valorem taxes. That bill died in the Senate Finance Committee.

Robertson, who is now in private practice as an attorney in Moss Point, echoed Watson’s assertion that the Department of Revenue has misinterpreted the 2005 bill.

“The intent of the bill was, in those types of housing developments, the income approach would be used. The income approach basically meant (accounting for) all the revenue generated off of it. (Tax credit sale revenue) would be included in that. It’s the whole package. A private housing development, you take in their revenue, land value, everything else. The same should be true for these Section 42s. That was the intent, that all sources of revenue would come into play.”

Reached on his cell phone, Joe Blount, who was chairman of the old tax commission when the 2005 changes were made, said he remembered meeting with officials from the MAS and a handful of tax assessors, but could not recall the details of those meetings.

Blount, who said he was unaware of the lawsuit against his old agency, left the tax commission in 2008 after four- and-a-half years.

“We made several changes (to the appraisal manual) while I was there,” he said. “I don’t remember ever having any kind of comments on any of the changes we made.”

Joel Yelverton, who was the executive director of the Mississippi Association of Supervisors in 2005, did not return a message left on his cell phone.

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Start of prep football season culmination of year-long efforts from booster clubs, parents

August 22nd, 2011 1 comment

Mississippi’s high school football season started last week.

The financial planning for it never stopped.

Before toe met leather last Thursday and Friday nights, the booster clubs that pay for everything from Gatorade to field houses had spent months raising money to carry out their missions of providing private financial support to their respective programs.

“We have several things we do throughout the year,” said John Morganti, president of the Northwest Rankin Cougar Club, the private fundraising arm of the high school’s football team.

The nature and frequency of those things has changed, though, as the economy first plunged into a recession and then began a slow crawl out of it.

Morganti said the Cougar Club has spent the past couple years casting a wider net than before.

“You can’t go out and get all the money you need at one time,” he said. “Especially with the economy, you’ve got to come up with new ideas and do smaller things more frequently. Obviously the sponsorships have dwindled some, so we’re having to target more and more companies. We’ve also tried to do things that the players and parents can help with to raise smaller amounts of money that add up. For example, one of our best fundraisers is a meat sale we do. We have a Boston butt and a turkey along with casseroles that we sell for Easter. That raises a pretty good bit of money and has been a pretty good success for us. You’re hitting a large amount of people up for a small amount of money. In the past one person basically could hit up several companies and get what you needed. You didn’t need to go after as many people. You can’t do that anymore.”

The Cougar Club brings in an average of $20,000 to $30,000, Morganti said, at least half of which pays for pregame meals for about 95 varsity and junior varsity players, coaches and support staff, and in-game Gatorade.

“Above and beyond the food and drinks, we’ll help with any new jerseys, maybe some minor equipment purchases for the coaches.”

Although it doesn’t raise enough money to buy big-ticket items like field houses and weight rooms, the Cougar Club does engage in some fundraising specifically to defray at least some of their cost. Morganti said the booster club will try to raise an additional $30,000 to $40,000 to renovate Northwest Rankin High School’s 30-year-old field house. The rest of the cost will have to come from the school district.

“Because we are simply a booster club for the football team, versus some other schools that have one club that covers all sports, we’re not able to go out there and raise $100,000,” Morganti said.

 The national champions get big money

Though its school is most famous for its powerhouse football teams, The South Panola Athletic Foundation serves as a fundraising umbrella organization for all sports.

The foundation started a few years ago to raise money for new field turf at South Panola’s Robert H. Dunlap Stadium at Tiger Field.

“We got a lot of sponsors to put in $50,000, $60,000 to get it going,” said foundation president Kenny Hopper, adding that the total amount reached about $500,000. Hopper hopes to have the $200,000 balance paid off within the next few years, when the foundation will begin to raise money for a new field house.

Like Northwest Rankin’s Cougar Club, the SPAF has had to ask for a little from a lot of sponsors, instead of depending on a handful of heavyweights to carry the financial load.

“Right now it’s hard to get anybody to give you any money,” Hopper said.

The $40,000 or $50,000 the foundation raises in an average year helps send players to camps, coaches to clinics, and pays some of the costs of the rings the Tigers have earned as a result of multiple state championships and a 2010 national championship, as determined by USA Today. The SPAF raised money for a banner celebrating that achievement that will hang at Dunlap Stadium.

 A growing proposition at Oak Grove

The booster club for Oak Grove High School, South Panola’s opponent in the 2009 state championship game, has come a long way the past 10 years.

“We’re kind of like the football team,” said Warrior Club vice president John Cummins. “In the late ‘90s, everybody wanted to schedule our football team for the homecoming game. The booster club didn’t have money to do anything but as the school’s grown and the team’s gotten better, so has the booster club. They go hand in hand. I hear from other people who have been involved 10 or 15 years, that we didn’t have the many to buy a laptop if the coaches needed it. It’s really grown. We can actually help now.”

Cummins would not give a ballpark figure for how much the Warrior Club, which raises money for all of Oak Grove’s sports teams, brings in during an average year. But he did say the club’s fundraising model has undergone the same transformation as its counterparts at Northwest Rankin and South Panola: asking for a little from a lot.

“That’s the good thing about a big district,” Cummins said. “If you get $25 from a lot of people, that’s just as good as getting several hundred from a couple.”

Money the Warrior Club raised in the past has paid for a new field house, and will eventually pay to renovate the school’s weight room.

“We do have some really involved businesses and sponsors that help out a lot,” Cummins said. “It kind of surprised me. Before I got involved I didn’t realize how much some of them do.”

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Cities, counties sue to amend rules governing Sec. 42 rules

August 21st, 2011 No comments

The Mississippi Association of Supervisors, the Mississippi Municipal League and dozens of cities and counties have sued the Mississippi Department of Revenue  over the guidelines that agency has in place to calculate tax obligations of Section 42 housing developments.

The complaint was filed in Hinds County Chancery Court earlier this month.

When developers, a lot of whom are from out of state, build Section 42, or what are commonly called affordable rental housing developments, they get federal tax credits for doing so. The credits are awarded by the federal government to the property, but what often happens is the developers sell the tax credits, bringing in millions of dollars when they do so. Buyers of these tax credits have to become listed owners on the limited liability partnerships, limited liability corporations or whatever entity owns the property.

In return for receiving these tax credits, the developers have to meet certain federal regulations that require them to maintain the property. If they fail to meet those requirements, they forfeit the tax credits.

The fact the developers receive these tax credits for building these affordable rental housing developments isn’t the issue the MML, MAS and the cities and counties have.

Here’s the issue: When tax assessors conduct their annual property valuations on these developments, which determines how much ad valorem tax the counties collect from them, they use the income capitalization approach, which calculates the income derived from the developments in one year. They can’t include the income developers make from selling federal tax credits.

The only income tax assessors are allowed to consider is the rent the developers collect from the tenants.  Because the housing is for low-income tenants, the rent is capped by the federal government.

In 2005, the Legislature passed, and Gov. Haley Barbour approved, Senate Bill 3100, which the plaintiffs believe allowed tax assessors to include income from tax credit sales for the developments’ ad valorem liability.

Shortly after the bill passed, former chairman Joseph Blount of the then-State Tax Commission changed that agency’s Land Valuation Manual to preclude the use of income derived from tax credit sales. Blount has since been replaced by Ed Morgan, who is named as the defendant in the lawsuit.

In their complaint, which represents one side of a legal argument, the plaintiffs allege that the Department of Revenue, because it is not allowing the inclusion of the tax credit sale revenue, is ignoring legislative intent. They cite in their complaint an amendment inserted into SB 3100 that did not allow for the inclusion of the revenue from tax credit sales. That amendment was stripped before the bill got to Barbour’s desk,  and the plaintiffs allege that proves the Legislature intended for tax assessors to calculate the tax credit sale revenue.

In the complaint, the MML, the MAS and the other plaintiffs assert that the exclusion of income derived from the sale of tax credits related to Section 42 housing developments has cost cities and counties untold millions of dollars.

The plaintiffs seek a declaratory judgment that would force the Department of Revenue to allow tax assessors to use the tax credit sale income in calculating tax liability for Section 42 housing developments.

Derrick Surrette, executive director of the Mississippi Association of Supervisors, said his organization has spent the legislative sessions since 2005 trying to get the law clarified to the point that the Department of Revenue would amend its LVM to allow for the accounting of tax credit sale revenue. He added that hearings with lawmakers and the development lobby and meetings with Morgan failed to produce an agreement.

“We were out of options,” he said of the decision to pursue litigation. “We felt compelled to do something.”

Kathy Waterbury, spokesperson for the Department of Revenue, did not return a phone message seeking comment. Efforts to reach MML executive director George Lewis were unsuccessful.

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MAS, MML sue Dept. of Revenue over Section 42 housing valuation rules

August 17th, 2011 No comments

The Mississippi Association of Supervisors, the Mississippi Municipal League and dozens of cities and counties have sued the Mississippi Department of Revenue  over the guidelines that agency has in place to calculate tax obligations of Section 42 housing developments.

The complaint was filed in Hinds County Chancery Court earlier this month.

When developers, a lot of whom are from out of state, build Section 42, or what are commonly called affordable rental housing, developments, they get federal tax credits for doing so. The credits are awarded by the federal government to the property, but what often happens is the developers sell the tax credits, bringing in millions of dollars when they do so. Buyers of these tax credits have to become listed owners on the limited liability partnerships, limited liability corporations or whatever entity owns the property.

In return for receiving these tax credits, the developers have to meet certain federal regulations that require them to maintain the property. If they fail to meet those requirements, they forfeit the tax credits.

The fact the developers receive these tax credits for building these affordable rental housing developments isn’t the issue the MML, MAS and the cities and counties have.

Here’s the issue: When tax assessors conduct their annual property valuations on these developments, which determines how much ad valorem tax the counties collect from them, they use the income capitalization approach, which calculates the income derived from the developments in one year. They can’t include the income developers make from selling federal tax credits, which can run into the millions of dollars.

The only income tax assessors are allowed to consider is the rent the developers collect from the tenants.  The rent is capped by the federal government.

In 2005, the Legislature passed, and Gov. Haley Barbour approved, Senate Bill 3100, which the plaintiffs believe allowed tax assessors to include income from tax credit sales for the ad valorem calculation for affordable rental housing.

Shortly after the bill passed, former chairman Joseph Blount of the then-State Tax Commission changed that agency’s Land Valuation Manual to preclude the use of income derived from tax credit sales. Blount has since been replaced by Ed Morgan, who is named as the defendant in the lawsuit.

The plaintiffs allege that the Department of Revenue, because it is not allowing the inclusion of the tax credit sale revenue, is ignoring legislative intent. They cite in their complaint an amendment inserted into SB 3100 that did not allow for the inclusion of the revenue from tax credit sales. That amendment was stripped before the bill got to Barbour’s desk,  and the plaintiffs allege that proves the Legislature intended for tax assessors to calculate the tax credit sale revenue.

In the complaint, the MML, the MAS and the other plaintiffs assert that the exclusion of income derived from the sale of tax credits related to Section 42 housing developments has cost cities and counties untold millions of dollars.

The plaintiffs seek a declaratory judgment that would force the Department of Revenue to allow tax assessors to use the tax credit sale income in calculating tax liability for Section 42 housing developments.

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Inside of Hotty Toddy Potties to feature advertising for first time this football season

August 14th, 2011 No comments

If such a thing as a captive advertising audience ever existed, one could be found in the Grove on football gamedays.

So it’s no surprise that Ole Miss officials have spent untold amounts of money and energy keeping the popular tailgating spot free of advertisers and solicitors “to keep it from becoming the Canton Flea Market,” said Andy Mullins, chief of staff to Chancellor Dan Jones and chairman of the Gameday Committee.

Those reins will be loosened this upcoming football season, but not by much: The university has contracted with a local start-up to install advertising on the interior of the portable restrooms that have become Grove staples since they first arrived about a decade ago. The Hotty Toddy Potties, like every other part of the Grove, had been completely off-limits to any form of political or business advertising or solicitation. Their outsides still are; only the inside will be adorned with advertisements.

Rounding up advertisers for the restrooms is Addison Edmonds, who started The Indoor ADvantage in 2009, shortly before he graduated from Ole Miss’ school of business.

Edmonds said the framed ads that will line the walls of the Hotty Toddy Potties won’t look anything like what you’d find in a truck stop or a convenience store.

“They are very elegant frames,” he said. “They’re about 18’ by 24’ in size, and there’s four 8’ by 10’ ads. I’ve got a great graphic designer; he makes everything look elegant. It’s not like we just print stuff out of my home computer and throw it up in a frame. It’s better-looking than what you think of when you first hear of restroom advertising.”

Office Depot, Direct Buy and Green Door, an Oxford company specializing in reclaimed and refurbished furniture, have signed on. Edmonds said frames and orders to his printer were sent last week, and installation of the 90 total frames would begin this week. Work will be completed in time for Ole Miss’ season opener Sept. 3 against BYU.

Mullins and Larry Sparks, vice chancellor for administration and finance, both said opening up the interiors of the Hotty Toddy Potties is not a step down the slippery slope of turning the Grove into an advertising extravaganza.

“We have university policies about political campaigning as well as vendor solicitation on campus during gameday,” said Sparks, whose office had to sign-off on the deal and who will have to sign-off on any changes in advertisers.  “We’ve tried to really control that because it could become overwhelming. But this is university-sponsored, and it’s confined to that one space.” Revenue generated from the ads will go into the school’s Preserve the Grove fund, which is used to maintain the 10-acre green space and to defray gameday expenses.

Edmonds, originally from Brentwood, Tenn., has had designs on starting his own advertising business since childhood. He approached Sparks and other Ole Miss officials in the late winter of this year about his idea for the Hotty Toddy Potties.

“I explained to them what we do, we came to an agreement and it pretty much doubled my business right away,” Edmonds said. “We’ve just been working real hard to get it all done and get everything finalized so we can go out and get some more advertisers for it.”

Before he landed the deal for the Hotty Toddy Potties, Edmonds had framed ads hanging in the restrooms of 30 locations around Oxford, mainly restaurants and bars. He also had agreements for the same at the new sports complex west of town and the Oxford Conference Center. That’s a far cry from when he started with only three restaurants.

“It was so hard to seem legitimate when I only had about 10 frames out there,” Edmonds said. “I had to basically ask advertisers to trust me and trust that it would work. It definitely helps me look legitimate (with all the new business) than it did when I first started out.”

The ads within the Hotty Toddy Potties perfectly legal, Mullins can spend his gamedays making sure no goods or services are being promoted or sold in other parts of the Grove. He said one recent football season he busted a tent set up by a national hardware chain. Even though no money was changing hands, promotional freebies were flowing like Grove bourbon, and it was just as frowned upon.

“I have to be the bad guy sometimes, but most of them understand once I explain it to them,” he said. “You have to be a lot more aggressive than most people realize.”

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MDA, GreenTech finalizing incentive package

August 14th, 2011 No comments

A Q&A with GreenTech president Terry McAuliffe that appeared in early August on the Washington Post‘s website has a lot of the same information the Mississippi Business Journal has reported since the first part of this year.

In it, McAuliffe says the production of the company’s MyCar neighborhood electric vehicle will start in Horn Lake late this year, with the first production run scheduled for sale in Denmark. The Tunica facility, where GTA hopes to build its midsize sedan and sport electric hybrid cars, is under construction. The company will also produce parts in the U.S. for a Chinese automaker.  McAuliffe’s claims back up what GreenTech CEO Charles Wang said in an emailed statement to the MBJ earlier this summer. Neither man put a timetable on production starting in Tunica. Site work there started a few months ago.

What’s new, though, is McAulife’s mention of an incentive package the company and the state are putting together. Since the groundbreaking ceremony for the Tunica facility nearly two years ago, the Mississippi Development Authority has waited for the company to raise private capital – at least some of it through the EB-5 Investment Visa, which grants permanent residency to foreign investors who pump at least $1 million into an economic development project, or at least $500,000 into one in an economically depressed area.

That is no longer the case. MDA spokesperson Melissa Medley said last week that the economic development agency and GreenTech are applying the final touches to an incentive package, and hoped to have it finalized and a memorandum of understanding signed in the next few weeks. Medley did not release details of the arrangement.

“They’ve met all the requirements we’ve set for them so far,” she said, without elaborating.

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MDA, GreenTech finalizing incentive package

August 9th, 2011 No comments

A Q&A with GreenTech president Terry McAuliffe that appeared over the weekend on the Washington Post‘s website has a lot of the same information that Magnolia Marketplace has reported since January.

The production of the company’s MyCar neighborhood electric vehicle will start in Horn Lake late this year, and the Tunica facility, where GTA hopes to build its midsize sedan and sport electric hybrid cars, is under construction. We’ve known that for a while now.

What stood out, though, is McAullife’s mention of an incentive package the company and the state are putting together. It’s notable because since the groundbreaking ceremony in Tunica nearly two years ago, the Mississippi Development Authority has sat back and waited for GreenTech to raise private capital.

That is no longer the case. MDA spokesperson Melissa Medley said Tuesday afternoon that the economic development agency and GreenTech are indeed applying the final touches to an incentive package, and hoped to have it finalized and a memorandum of understanding signed in the next few weeks. She did not release details, but it’s common sense to think that the numbers won’t be very big. Maybe they will. We’ll just have to wait and see.

To read the full Q&A with McAuliffe, click here.