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Tag Archives: Mark Baker

Lawmakers again seek role in choice of standardized tests

JACKSON — Lawmakers are seeking to revive efforts to force the state Board of Education to consider using standardized tests written by the ACT organization. The move comes as state Superintendent Carey Wright defends the process by which the state Department of Education sought proposals for a contract to administer tests in grades 3-8 and high school. ACT dropped out, ...

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House votes for medicinal marijuana oil legislation

Mississippi lawmakers have voted to make the use of marijuana legal— kind of. The Mississippi House of Representatives voted yesterday to make a medicinal marijuana oil legal in the state under tightly controlled circumstances. The House voted 112-6 to pass the final version of House Bill 1231. The Senate still must approve the agreement before it goes to Gov. Phil ...

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Criminal justice legislation moves forward

JACKSON — A bill that supporters say could make Mississippi’s criminal justice system more efficient and cut prison costs by hundreds of millions of dollars is one step from going to Gov. Phil Bryant. The House and Senate yesterday both passed the final version of House Bill 585. The House held it for the possibility of more debate, but there’s ...

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Few issues are more important for the state than healthcare

There are few issues that are more important or pressing for Mississippi businesses and consumers than the question of health care. As most of us are aware, the Magnolia State ranks far down the list in terms of the health of our population. Obesity, heart disease, diabetes, cancer — these are generally more impacting on Mississippians than in many other ...

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Current tort damages cap statute likely to remain as-is

The Mississippi Supreme Court declined in late August to say whether the state’s $1 million cap on noneconomic damages in civil cases is constitutional. If and when the court takes up the matter in the future, justices will most likely be examining the same law then as they did recently. The current law is sound enough that it can withstand ...

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