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Author Archives: Nash Nunnery

Top 40: Tom Walker

Not many people can boast that they earned a law degree and passed the CPA exam in one sitting. Tom Walker can. Now the chief financial officer and legal counsel for the Bank of Forest, Walker enjoys a career that combines the best the financial and legal worlds offer. But despite his professional achievements, the Starkville native admits convincing his ...

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Top 40: Jon Seawright

Before he decided to undertake a career in the law profession, Jon Seawright acted as general manager of his family’s monument company. Now a shareholder with Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell & Berkowitz, PC, the Texas native’s professional life is set in stone. In addition to his responsibilities as an attorney, Seawright also serves as the firm’s recruiting chairman and as ...

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William Chad Blackard

As a nursing home administrator for Trinity Mission Health and Rehab of Clinton, Chad Blackard sees crisis management as a crucial element of his job. “We’re open 24 hours a day, 365 days a year, so there can be a crisis at any moment,” he said. “There can be a resident’s death, upset family member or angry employee. The ability ...

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Top 40: Dusty Rhoads

Helping create and maintain the strong business relationships required for a company that earns more than a billion dollars a year in revenues is not an easy task for Dusty Rhoads. Doing so in the ever-competitive construction industry makes the Rankin County native’s job almost daunting but the manager of business development for Yates Construction Co. takes it all in ...

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Agriculture think tank

Situated not a cotton spindle’s throw from historic Highway 1 near the unincorporated community of Scott sits the “think tank” for the Mississippi Delta farmer. There aren’t any ivy walls or backpack-toting coeds on this campus but rest assured, knowledge is at the core of the Scott Learning Center, where cotton, soybeans and corn are “spoken” and the farmer stands ...

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Our homegrown commodity

Aside from politics and sports talk, there is little question that the conversation in Mississippi always comes back to food and where to get a taste of some homegrown country goodness. Mouth-watering fresh fruits and vegetables are produced abundantly in a state known first and foremost for agriculture and one has to look no further than their own neighborhood or ...

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A staple since 1977, ‘Farmweek’ has changed with the times and survived on Mississippi television

According to the final Nielson television ratings, the “Six Million Dollar Man,” “Charlie’s Angels” and “MASH” were the top three network television shows in 1977. In October that year, a 30-minute newsmagazine program devoted to Mississippi agriculture quietly debuted statewide on Mississippi public broadcasting stations. And not unlike the Energizer Bunny, “Farmweek” keeps going and going and going. Now in ...

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Milking 150 cows just the start of the day

To the casual observer, there doesn’t appear to be enough hours in the day for Randy Knight. Elected as president of the Mississippi Farm Bureau Federation last December, the 48-year-old Knight isn’t just a figurehead for the organization which is considered the voice for Mississippi farm families. He’s a dairy farmer and rancher himself. “Leaving the farm every day and ...

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‘The Tunica Miracle’

The memories of Sugar Ditch Alley and the nation’s highest rate of poverty made infamous by a 1960s network television documentary have all but faded in Tunica County. An impoverished neighborhood in the Town of Tunica, Sugar Ditch Alley was so named for the open sewer located there. With the advent of the gaming industry nearly two decades ago and ...

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Starkville isn’t the same old sleepy Starkville that most Mississippians knew 20 years ago

This is not your daddy’s sleepy, little college town. For the past two decades, merchants in downtown Starkville have quietly transformed a city that was considered to be a poor third behind other Mississippi college towns such as Oxford and Hattiesburg. No more. Award-winning restaurants, boutique retail and other specialty shops and attractions are the rule rather than the exception ...

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