Home » OPINION » Columns

Columns

Analysis: Quirky or serious, legal opinions guide officials

Can a Mississippi school district give financial rewards to students who do well on college entrance exams? Can a city government remove a dilapidated building if the owner does not do it? Is the sheriff’s son allowed to work as a volunteer deputy? These are among the questions that government officials have asked Mississippi Attorney General Lynn Fitch this year. ...

Read More »

BILL CRAWFORD — Broken promises, record deficits, and surging debt

Well, if COVID-19 hadn’t come along the “greatest economy ever” would be well on its way to keeping President Donald Trump’s promise to balance the budget and eliminate the national debt. No, budget deficits and the national debt have increased every year since he took office. What? The year before Trump took office in 2016 the deficit was $585 billion ...

Read More »

JACK WEATHERLY — Wells’ memoir offers best of two worlds

Memoirs come in two categories. One is by famous people, whatever that means. The other is by others who are not so famous, if at all. The former has the sales advantage. And less is expected, though more is hoped for. Luckily, for some, they can have it both ways. It’s tempting to say that Lawrence Wells’ memoir, “In Faulkner’s ...

Read More »

TODD SMITH — Americans believe brands should take lead against racism

Months into nationwide protests over racial injustice, a majority of American consumers continue to believe that brands should speak out publicly about systemic racism and racial injustice, according to a special report recently released by the Edelman Trust Barometer. The report, “The Fight For Racial Justice In America,” shows that 54% of a national sample of U.S. adults surveyed agreed ...

Read More »

MATT ALLEN — Presidential platforms for environmental law

This year marks the 50th anniversary of the Environmental Protection Agency, whose mission is to protect human health and the environment. This particular presidential election will have a significant impact on the EPA’s domain and the regulations and rules we use to govern business and citizen behavior. President Donald Trump has been known for the general rollback of the environmental ...

Read More »

BILL CRAWFORD — Reeves less politicizing than Trump on COVID-19

Gov. Tate Reeves bemoaned the politicization of COVID-19 coronavirus last week, reported Mississippi Today. He complained that there are “certain groups that want to politicize everything.” Hmmm. To whom was the governor addressing his concern? The “certain group” most politicizing the pandemic is led by his political hero, President Donald Trump. News reports aplenty, starting back in March, attest to ...

Read More »

TODD SMITH — NFL to allow social justice messages on helmets

The NFL will allow players to feature decals on the back of helmets with the names or initials of victims of racism and police violence this season. The NFL has been in talks with the player’s association since June about honoring such victims, according to The Undefeated’s Jason Reid. Additionally, individual players will be given the option to choose different names. ...

Read More »

BILL CRAWFORD — When will Mississippi’s economy recover?

As the $3 billion stimulus impact provided by Congress winds down, businesses spend out their Paycheck Protection Program loans, and the extra $600 in weekly unemployment payments ends, is Mississippi’s economy ready to go it alone? Both the president and the congress agree more stimulus money is needed to keep the national economy going, but they cannot agree on how ...

Read More »

BILL CRAWFORD — Russians use active measures to invade America

The Russians Are Coming, the Russians Are Coming was a 1966 comedy about an accidental Russian invasion on the west coast. The Guatemalans are coming, the Guatemalans are coming was the comedic response when our president in 2018 projected an immigrant invasion on the Mexican border. Of the two it turns out the Russian invasion was no joke. “Active measures” ...

Read More »

PHIL HARDWICK — How to deal with Cancel Culture

On October 16, 1968, two American athletes who had just won gold and bronze medals in the Olympics each raised black-gloved fists as they stood on the medal stand during the playing of the Star-Spangled Banner to draw attention to racial and social issues in the United States. In his autobiography, Silent Gesture, Tommie Smith, who had won the gold ...

Read More »